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Tamron 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD for Sony Full Frame/APS-C E-Mount, Black
Tamron 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD for Sony Full Frame/APS-C E-Mount, Black
Tamron 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD for Sony Full Frame/APS-C E-Mount, Black
Tamron 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD for Sony Full Frame/APS-C E-Mount, Black
Tamron 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD for Sony Full Frame/APS-C E-Mount, Black
Tamron 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD for Sony Full Frame/APS-C E-Mount, Black
Tamron 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD for Sony Full Frame/APS-C E-Mount, Black
Tamron 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD for Sony Full Frame/APS-C E-Mount, Black

Tamron 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD for Sony Full Frame/APS-C E-Mount, Black

Tamron 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD for Sony Full Frame/APS-C E-Mount, Black
Tamron 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD for Sony Full Frame/APS-C E-Mount, Black
Tamron 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD for Sony Full Frame/APS-C E-Mount, Black
Tamron 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD for Sony Full Frame/APS-C E-Mount, Black
Tamron 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD for Sony Full Frame/APS-C E-Mount, Black
Tamron 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD for Sony Full Frame/APS-C E-Mount, Black
Tamron 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD for Sony Full Frame/APS-C E-Mount, Black
Tamron 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD for Sony Full Frame/APS-C E-Mount, Black
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Features

  • Lightest and most compact in its class of fast tele zooms for Sony full-frame mirrorless
  • VXD linear motor focus mechanism delivers high-speed and high precision autofocus performance
  • Superior optical design for uncompromised image quality
  • Moisture-Resistant Construction, Fluorine Coating, and Zoom Lock switch
  • Tamron 6 Year Limited USA Warranty for new lenses purchased from Tamron USA Authorized Dealer

Description

The 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD (Model A056) large aperture telephoto zoom lens is designed for Sony E-mount full-frame mirrorless cameras and is just as comfortable on APS-C mirrorless as well. The greatest feature is its superb performance even while attaining a high-speed F/2.8 aperture across the entire zoom range and offering the world's lightest and most compact package at just 5.9" length (at the 70mm setting) and a weight of 28.6 oz. Thanks to the generous use of special lens elements, the 70-180mm F/2.8 achieves excellent optical performance from center to edge. With the short MOD (Minimum Object Distance) of 33.5", the 70-180mm F/2.8 expands the possibilities for photographic expression. For the AF drive, Tamron has newly developed the VXD (Voice-coil eXtreme-torque Drive), a linear motor focus mechanism that delivers high-speed and high precision autofocus performance for both stills and video. Add it all together and you can go light while going long—and get the shot!


Product Dimensions 5.9 x 3.18 x 3.18 inches


Item Weight 2 pounds


ASIN B086Q57BVY


Item model number AFA056S700


Customer Reviews 4.9 out of 5 stars 33 ratings 4.9 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #65 in SLR Camera Lenses


Date First Available April 2, 2020


Manufacturer Tamron


Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Unless otherwise stated above, most products arrive within 2-3 business days. Larger items may take 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Features

  • Lightest and most compact in its class of fast tele zooms for Sony full-frame mirrorless
  • VXD linear motor focus mechanism delivers high-speed and high precision autofocus performance
  • Superior optical design for uncompromised image quality
  • Moisture-Resistant Construction, Fluorine Coating, and Zoom Lock switch
  • Tamron 6 Year Limited USA Warranty for new lenses purchased from Tamron USA Authorized Dealer

Description

The 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD (Model A056) large aperture telephoto zoom lens is designed for Sony E-mount full-frame mirrorless cameras and is just as comfortable on APS-C mirrorless as well. The greatest feature is its superb performance even while attaining a high-speed F/2.8 aperture across the entire zoom range and offering the world's lightest and most compact package at just 5.9" length (at the 70mm setting) and a weight of 28.6 oz. Thanks to the generous use of special lens elements, the 70-180mm F/2.8 achieves excellent optical performance from center to edge. With the short MOD (Minimum Object Distance) of 33.5", the 70-180mm F/2.8 expands the possibilities for photographic expression. For the AF drive, Tamron has newly developed the VXD (Voice-coil eXtreme-torque Drive), a linear motor focus mechanism that delivers high-speed and high precision autofocus performance for both stills and video. Add it all together and you can go light while going long—and get the shot!


Product Dimensions 5.9 x 3.18 x 3.18 inches


Item Weight 2 pounds


ASIN B086Q57BVY


Item model number AFA056S700


Customer Reviews 4.9 out of 5 stars 33 ratings 4.9 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #65 in SLR Camera Lenses


Date First Available April 2, 2020


Manufacturer Tamron


Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Unless otherwise stated above, most products arrive within 2-3 business days. Larger items may take 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Features

  • Lightest and most compact in its class of fast tele zooms for Sony full-frame mirrorless
  • VXD linear motor focus mechanism delivers high-speed and high precision autofocus performance
  • Superior optical design for uncompromised image quality
  • Moisture-Resistant Construction, Fluorine Coating, and Zoom Lock switch
  • Tamron 6 Year Limited USA Warranty for new lenses purchased from Tamron USA Authorized Dealer

Description

The 70-180mm F/2.8 Di III VXD (Model A056) large aperture telephoto zoom lens is designed for Sony E-mount full-frame mirrorless cameras and is just as comfortable on APS-C mirrorless as well. The greatest feature is its superb performance even while attaining a high-speed F/2.8 aperture across the entire zoom range and offering the world's lightest and most compact package at just 5.9" length (at the 70mm setting) and a weight of 28.6 oz. Thanks to the generous use of special lens elements, the 70-180mm F/2.8 achieves excellent optical performance from center to edge. With the short MOD (Minimum Object Distance) of 33.5", the 70-180mm F/2.8 expands the possibilities for photographic expression. For the AF drive, Tamron has newly developed the VXD (Voice-coil eXtreme-torque Drive), a linear motor focus mechanism that delivers high-speed and high precision autofocus performance for both stills and video. Add it all together and you can go light while going long—and get the shot!


Product Dimensions 5.9 x 3.18 x 3.18 inches


Item Weight 2 pounds


ASIN B086Q57BVY


Item model number AFA056S700


Customer Reviews 4.9 out of 5 stars 33 ratings 4.9 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #65 in SLR Camera Lenses


Date First Available April 2, 2020


Manufacturer Tamron


abunda_amazon_reviews I am a well known pro. In more than 30 years, I have never desired to use a non-Nikon, Canon or Sony lens. Until now. The Tamron 70-180mm f2.8 Di III VXD is a legitimate game changer. So much so that this lens was a major push for me to switch to Sony after 15 years with Canon. I have depended on all the 70-200mm f2.8 lenses from Canon, Nikon and Sony. (See photo) This is my favorite telephoto zoom length and I own several. Yet, with all being fine performers, until now my most used lens in this focal length has been Canon’s slower 70-200 f4 IS lens. Why? WEIGHT COMPARISONS: TAMRON VS. SONY VS. CANON VS. NIKON For me, shooting comfort and non-fatiguing weight are high priorities when reaching for the the right lens for the job. The Canon 70-200 f4 IS is much more comfortable to hold than their 70-200 2.8 IS II at a quite tiring 53 ounces. When I needed the extra f-stop of light, I would grudgingly pull out my oh-so-heavy Canon 2.8. Sony’s 70-200 is astoundingly sharp at a similar weight of 52 ounces. Enter the $1,200 Tamron: Wowza! Tamron’s newly released 70-180 f2.8 lens weighs just 28.6 ounces—easier to maneuver than my beloved Canon f4 that only captures half the light. Since this Tamron is engineered specifically for the Sony FE mount, when you compare f2.8 zooms: Tamron’s is 45% lighter than the Sony. ARE THE LATEST CANON AND NIKON MIRRORLESS LENSES EVEN LIGHTER THAN TAMRON? Nope. Canon’s recently released RF 70-200 f2.8 is less hefty than earlier models at 37 ounces but costs $2,700. The just released Nikon Z 70-200 f2.8 weighs a clunky 53 ounces and is priced at $2,600. MOST IMPORTANT: IS THE TAMRON AS SHARP AS SONY, CANON OR NIKON? That’s the crucial question I asked myself. This new Tamron design was engineered specifically for Sony. The Sony full frame lenses have been almost revolutionary in terms of sharpness as compared with Canon lenses, previously heralded as the world’s best. One great push for me to go mirrorless is Sony’s superior optics. However, their 70-200 f4 isn’t as sharp as their great 2.8 and the Sony 2.8 is just as heavy as Canon’s EF version. When Tamron recently announced this new 70-180, several of us asked, “Is it too good to be true?” Without hesitation, I can say: It is indeed true. For any pro (or serious amateur), it’s all about razor sharpness when your own reputation is on the line. You can search and find excellent “pixel-peeping” reviews that are just as impressed with this new Tamron as I am. However, for me, it’s not about test charts and obscure coma and bokeh tests at 500%, but instead real world results and great, effortless images. To clarify, sharpness is the first must have quality. In the biz, we call this “tack sharp” and I am super impressed. I’m finding that using Sony’s AF-C mode works really well. The EYE-AF tracking setting is also extraordinarily quick and effective. Shooting comfort is of such primary importance that I was not ready to switch to Sony without an easier to handle solution in this focal range. The Tamron 70-180 f2.8 is just as sharp as the Sony 70-200 f2.8 while being far easier to handle. And, in several of my head to head tests, sharper yet. It’s that good. (The bokeh is just fine, by the way.) THE TAMRON HAS NO BUILT IN IMAGE STABILIZATION. DOES THIS MATTER? In everyday shooting, not really. Image stabilization was a “gotta have it” feature for telephoto zooms in the days before IBIS camera bodies. To keep both price and lens weight down, this Tamron was smartly designed without Vibration Compensation (VC) to take advantage of Sony’s stabilized full frame bodies. With Sony’s IBIS, I can hand hold this lens at 1/30th of a second with a reasonably good keeper rate. Losing lens stabilization in exchange for a fantastic maximum aperture of f2.8 will allow a higher shutter speed and the ability to “stop action.” In this price range, typical f4 telephoto zooms will be strongly disadvantaged with moving subjects unless you double your camera’s ISO setting to let the equivalent amount of light to reach the camera’s sensor. In a direct comparison hand holding the Tamron vs the Sony 70-200 f2.8 at lowest shutter speeds, I found that Sony has a slight edge, due to the combination of in camera IBIS and stabilization also built in to the lens. However, in camera IBIS does a great job with the Tamron and I’m quite satisfied. In real world use, I would rarely seek shutter speeds under 1/60th with a telephoto zoom anyway. The Sony 70-200 f2.8 is also a truly terrific five-star lens but at the cost of 45% more weight and an additional $1,400. I do get tired holding it. IS THE TAMRON DISADVANTAGED BY ONLY REACHING 180MM INSTEAD OF 200MM? In answering this question, I’m somewhat biased. 180 is my favorite telephoto focal length. For many years as a Nikon shooter, I used my (non-stabilized) 180 f2.8 almost as much as my 24mm, a fave wide choice. So, for the Tamron to reach an equivalent of 200mm like the Sony, I simply take one large step closer. Simple and effective. NEWS FLASH . . . WOULD YOU ALSO LOVE TO HAVE A NEW 105-270 f 2.8 TAMRON ZOOM? Huh, you say?? I first worried Sony’s huge 61 megapixel file size in the A7R IV might be a disadvantage. I have quickly learned it’s actually a big time game changer in terms of telephoto reach. Just pop on the Tamron zoom, customize one of the camera buttons to quickly change the camera to APS-C crop mode, and you have an instant 105-270 f2.8 lens with zero loss in sharpness! Unlike teleconverters, you do not lose one f-stop of light. What do you lose? The file size reduces from 61MP to 27MP—still a huge file big enough for a super sharp billboard sized advertisement. My most recent Canon camera, the wonderful pro 5D Mark IV, is beloved by pros. Its maximum file size is 30 megapixels, virtually the same as the Sony A7R IV set to APS-C crop mode. For other Sony a7 full frame models, first determine your original max file size: typically 42MP or 24MP. When switching into APS-C crop mode, you are also left with a quite good sized file. For example: A7R III=18MP in crop mode while A7 III=11MP in crop mode. By the way, have you priced a 300mm f2.8 lens lately? $6,000 and up compared to this Tamron at $1,199. I own an excellent Nikon 300 f2.8. This Tamron yields a 270mm f2.8 in APS-C mode that is as crisp as my legendary Nikkor. CAN YOU BUY A TELECONVERTER SPECIFICALLY FOR THIS TAMRON? Unfortunately, no. I hope Tamron will develop one. That’s one advantage the dedicated 70-200mm f2.8 lenses have. They do accommodate teleconverters but at the cost of losing one f-stop worth of light when using a 1.4X version. Thus, a 2.8 lens becomes an f4 when adding the teleconverter to the back of the lens. However, as of the date of this review, no other camera brand yet has a relatively affordable 61MP camera that allows the option to have a 2.8 lens without need for teleconverter (as long as you switch to APS-C mode). CONCLUSION: Is this a glowing review? You betcha. Minor tradeoffs for major advantages is a deal I’ll take every time. Focus is quick and “hunting” is rare. This is my first Tamron but I have a feeling it won’t be my last. It features good build quality for all but the harshest of shooting conditions. If you were to repaint this sleek Tamron white, rebrand as “Sony” and double the price, you’d still have a fantastic lens that focuses fast. You may recall that above I described the Sony version as “astoundingly sharp.” The Tamron 70-180mm f2.8 Di III VXD is a wee bit sharper yet. Hope this long review has been of some small help. HAPPY SHOOTING!;;Reviewed in the United States on May 27, 2020;;5.0 out of 5 stars;;Can the Tamron 70-180mm f2.8 lens compete with Sony at less than half the price?;;Johnny;;;I got mine today and just spent two hours testing this lens outside on a cloudy day. The autofocus is super fast, the picture quality is in part with the Sony 70-200/2.8, but the best thing about his lens is its weight and size (also the price). All I can say is if you are invested in Sony this is probably the lens to get right now.;;Reviewed in the United States on May 17, 2020;;5.0 out of 5 stars;;Best investment if you are a Sony shooter;;juan;;;After a lifetime of shooting with Canon cameras, I recently switched to the Sony mirrorless system with a Sony a9. With a Sigma lens adapter, I can still use my amazing Canon lenses, but being that they are non-native lenses to the Sony, they work for stationary and slow to medium moving subjects. The Canon lenses can't keep up with the fast action that the Sony a9 camera body is so famous for. So I knew that a few new lenses need to be added. I've spent enough time behind a camera to know pretty quickly whether a lens is working for me or not. After testing several Sony lenses that were lack-luster and were returned, I decided to give this one a try. I have the equivalent of this lens from Canon. And it is the finest lens that I own. To my shock and amazement, this little gem of Tamron's is exceeding my expectations. It's about half the weight, half the size and a fraction of the price of my equivalent Canon lens. Why did I need this if I already have the Canon 2.8 lens you ask? Because I have no interest in hiking, walking and exploring long distances with a lens the size and weight of a sewer pipe hanging around my neck. This little Tamron is the perfect hiking companion. It is much more of a "walk-about" lens than my Canon one is. For me there are two things that I look for in any camera lens. A: Sharpness B: Consistency of performance. This lens aces both. I will pay more for these qualities, but in this case, you don't have to. The fixed 2.8 aperture is such an amazing thing to have in a lens and this lens syncs up with my Sony a9 perfectly. There is a slight "clunking" sound when the lens focuses, but with the reading that I've done, this is normal, so it's fine. I've found that I can get to within about 14" of my subject while zoomed all the way in, which gives this lens a bit of a "macro" feature...not a true macro, but very nice for a mid-range zoom. Tamron used a lot of plastic on this lens to keep the weight down. It feels very solid to me. I'm not hard on my camera gear, so I don't see that as a problem. Also, there is no image stabilization within the lens. I shot in all kinds of light and I admit that I've got a fairly steady hand, so that is not going to be an issue for me at all. And my camera body has some stabilization built in to it. For the money, you just can't beat this lens for your Sony E mount cameras. There is a reason that most photographers are giving this thing five stars. I'll let my images speak for themselves.;;Reviewed in the United States on July 6, 2020;;5.0 out of 5 stars;;WOW;;JJ;;;I wanted to buy long zoom lens for my sony for a long time now. Sony 70-200/f2.8 was expensive and heavy for me. So I was thinking about buying 70-200/f4, but when I saw first reviews showing sharpness of this Tamron I decided to wait. I that was a right choice. With first images I was surprised with how sharp this lens is. It is also not much bigger than Tamron 28-75 that I also own (significantly heavier though, but that's to be expected). It doesn't have optical stabilization, which is good to have on telephoto lenses (in-body stabilization works better on smaller focal distances), but for the price and its versatility I expect it to be on my sony body a significant amount of time. And with the same 67mm filter diameter I don't have to buy new set of filters. Tamron wins my heart and my money once again! Update: after a few days I've noticed a sound as if something was loose inside the lens when shaken a bit. After some research I now know that its focusing mechanism that moves freely when camera is powered off (or lens is detached). This is due to this lens using electromagnetic coils to move focusing mechanism as oppose to servo motors. I would still recommend this lens as this doesn't affect picture quality or experience, but I wish they would come up with some solution to fix all moving parts when camera turns off.;;Reviewed in the United States on June 5, 2020;;5.0 out of 5 stars;;Best value telephoto zoom lens for sony;;volterr

Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Orders placed now will arrive in 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Top Amazon Reviews


5.0 out of 5 stars
By Johnny - Reviewed in the United States on May 27, 2020
Can the Tamron 70-180mm f2.8 lens compete with Sony at less than half the price?
I am a well known pro. In more than 30 years, I have never desired to use a non-Nikon, Canon or Sony lens. Until now. The Tamron 70-180mm f2.8 Di III VXD is a legitimate game changer. So much so that this lens was a major push for me to switch to Sony after 15 years with Canon. I have depended on all the 70-200mm f2.8 lenses from Canon, Nikon and Sony. (See photo) This is my favorite telephoto zoom length and I own several. Yet, with all being fine performers, until now my most used lens in this focal length has been Canon’s slower 70-200 f4 IS lens. Why? WEIGHT COMPARISONS: TAMRON VS. SONY VS. CANON VS. NIKON For me, shooting comfort and non-fatiguing weight are high priorities when reaching for the the right lens for the job. The Canon 70-200 f4 IS is much more comfortable to hold than their 70-200 2.8 IS II at a quite tiring 53 ounces. When I needed the extra f-stop of light, I would grudgingly pull out my oh-so-heavy Canon 2.8. Sony’s 70-200 is astoundingly sharp at a similar weight of 52 ounces. Enter the $1,200 Tamron: Wowza! Tamron’s newly released 70-180 f2.8 lens weighs just 28.6 ounces—easier to maneuver than my beloved Canon f4 that only captures half the light. Since this Tamron is engineered specifically for the Sony FE mount, when you compare f2.8 zooms: Tamron’s is 45% lighter than the Sony. ARE THE LATEST CANON AND NIKON MIRRORLESS LENSES EVEN LIGHTER THAN TAMRON? Nope. Canon’s recently released RF 70-200 f2.8 is less hefty than earlier models at 37 ounces but costs $2,700. The just released Nikon Z 70-200 f2.8 weighs a clunky 53 ounces and is priced at $2,600. MOST IMPORTANT: IS THE TAMRON AS SHARP AS SONY, CANON OR NIKON? That’s the crucial question I asked myself. This new Tamron design was engineered specifically for Sony. The Sony full frame lenses have been almost revolutionary in terms of sharpness as compared with Canon lenses, previously heralded as the world’s best. One great push for me to go mirrorless is Sony’s superior optics. However, their 70-200 f4 isn’t as sharp as their great 2.8 and the Sony 2.8 is just as heavy as Canon’s EF version. When Tamron recently announced this new 70-180, several of us asked, “Is it too good to be true?” Without hesitation, I can say: It is indeed true. For any pro (or serious amateur), it’s all about razor sharpness when your own reputation is on the line. You can search and find excellent “pixel-peeping” reviews that are just as impressed with this new Tamron as I am. However, for me, it’s not about test charts and obscure coma and bokeh tests at 500%, but instead real world results and great, effortless images. To clarify, sharpness is the first must have quality. In the biz, we call this “tack sharp” and I am super impressed. I’m finding that using Sony’s AF-C mode works really well. The EYE-AF tracking setting is also extraordinarily quick and effective. Shooting comfort is of such primary importance that I was not ready to switch to Sony without an easier to handle solution in this focal range. The Tamron 70-180 f2.8 is just as sharp as the Sony 70-200 f2.8 while being far easier to handle. And, in several of my head to head tests, sharper yet. It’s that good. (The bokeh is just fine, by the way.) THE TAMRON HAS NO BUILT IN IMAGE STABILIZATION. DOES THIS MATTER? In everyday shooting, not really. Image stabilization was a “gotta have it” feature for telephoto zooms in the days before IBIS camera bodies. To keep both price and lens weight down, this Tamron was smartly designed without Vibration Compensation (VC) to take advantage of Sony’s stabilized full frame bodies. With Sony’s IBIS, I can hand hold this lens at 1/30th of a second with a reasonably good keeper rate. Losing lens stabilization in exchange for a fantastic maximum aperture of f2.8 will allow a higher shutter speed and the ability to “stop action.” In this price range, typical f4 telephoto zooms will be strongly disadvantaged with moving subjects unless you double your camera’s ISO setting to let the equivalent amount of light to reach the camera’s sensor. In a direct comparison hand holding the Tamron vs the Sony 70-200 f2.8 at lowest shutter speeds, I found that Sony has a slight edge, due to the combination of in camera IBIS and stabilization also built in to the lens. However, in camera IBIS does a great job with the Tamron and I’m quite satisfied. In real world use, I would rarely seek shutter speeds under 1/60th with a telephoto zoom anyway. The Sony 70-200 f2.8 is also a truly terrific five-star lens but at the cost of 45% more weight and an additional $1,400. I do get tired holding it. IS THE TAMRON DISADVANTAGED BY ONLY REACHING 180MM INSTEAD OF 200MM? In answering this question, I’m somewhat biased. 180 is my favorite telephoto focal length. For many years as a Nikon shooter, I used my (non-stabilized) 180 f2.8 almost as much as my 24mm, a fave wide choice. So, for the Tamron to reach an equivalent of 200mm like the Sony, I simply take one large step closer. Simple and effective. NEWS FLASH . . . WOULD YOU ALSO LOVE TO HAVE A NEW 105-270 f 2.8 TAMRON ZOOM? Huh, you say?? I first worried Sony’s huge 61 megapixel file size in the A7R IV might be a disadvantage. I have quickly learned it’s actually a big time game changer in terms of telephoto reach. Just pop on the Tamron zoom, customize one of the camera buttons to quickly change the camera to APS-C crop mode, and you have an instant 105-270 f2.8 lens with zero loss in sharpness! Unlike teleconverters, you do not lose one f-stop of light. What do you lose? The file size reduces from 61MP to 27MP—still a huge file big enough for a super sharp billboard sized advertisement. My most recent Canon camera, the wonderful pro 5D Mark IV, is beloved by pros. Its maximum file size is 30 megapixels, virtually the same as the Sony A7R IV set to APS-C crop mode. For other Sony a7 full frame models, first determine your original max file size: typically 42MP or 24MP. When switching into APS-C crop mode, you are also left with a quite good sized file. For example: A7R III=18MP in crop mode while A7 III=11MP in crop mode. By the way, have you priced a 300mm f2.8 lens lately? $6,000 and up compared to this Tamron at $1,199. I own an excellent Nikon 300 f2.8. This Tamron yields a 270mm f2.8 in APS-C mode that is as crisp as my legendary Nikkor. CAN YOU BUY A TELECONVERTER SPECIFICALLY FOR THIS TAMRON? Unfortunately, no. I hope Tamron will develop one. That’s one advantage the dedicated 70-200mm f2.8 lenses have. They do accommodate teleconverters but at the cost of losing one f-stop worth of light when using a 1.4X version. Thus, a 2.8 lens becomes an f4 when adding the teleconverter to the back of the lens. However, as of the date of this review, no other camera brand yet has a relatively affordable 61MP camera that allows the option to have a 2.8 lens without need for teleconverter (as long as you switch to APS-C mode). CONCLUSION: Is this a glowing review? You betcha. Minor tradeoffs for major advantages is a deal I’ll take every time. Focus is quick and “hunting” is rare. This is my first Tamron but I have a feeling it won’t be my last. It features good build quality for all but the harshest of shooting conditions. If you were to repaint this sleek Tamron white, rebrand as “Sony” and double the price, you’d still have a fantastic lens that focuses fast. You may recall that above I described the Sony version as “astoundingly sharp.” The Tamron 70-180mm f2.8 Di III VXD is a wee bit sharper yet. Hope this long review has been of some small help. HAPPY SHOOTING!

5.0 out of 5 stars
By juan - Reviewed in the United States on May 17, 2020
Best investment if you are a Sony shooter
I got mine today and just spent two hours testing this lens outside on a cloudy day. The autofocus is super fast, the picture quality is in part with the Sony 70-200/2.8, but the best thing about his lens is its weight and size (also the price). All I can say is if you are invested in Sony this is probably the lens to get right now.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By JJ - Reviewed in the United States on July 6, 2020
WOW
After a lifetime of shooting with Canon cameras, I recently switched to the Sony mirrorless system with a Sony a9. With a Sigma lens adapter, I can still use my amazing Canon lenses, but being that they are non-native lenses to the Sony, they work for stationary and slow to medium moving subjects. The Canon lenses can't keep up with the fast action that the Sony a9 camera body is so famous for. So I knew that a few new lenses need to be added. I've spent enough time behind a camera to know pretty quickly whether a lens is working for me or not. After testing several Sony lenses that were lack-luster and were returned, I decided to give this one a try. I have the equivalent of this lens from Canon. And it is the finest lens that I own. To my shock and amazement, this little gem of Tamron's is exceeding my expectations. It's about half the weight, half the size and a fraction of the price of my equivalent Canon lens. Why did I need this if I already have the Canon 2.8 lens you ask? Because I have no interest in hiking, walking and exploring long distances with a lens the size and weight of a sewer pipe hanging around my neck. This little Tamron is the perfect hiking companion. It is much more of a "walk-about" lens than my Canon one is. For me there are two things that I look for in any camera lens. A: Sharpness B: Consistency of performance. This lens aces both. I will pay more for these qualities, but in this case, you don't have to. The fixed 2.8 aperture is such an amazing thing to have in a lens and this lens syncs up with my Sony a9 perfectly. There is a slight "clunking" sound when the lens focuses, but with the reading that I've done, this is normal, so it's fine. I've found that I can get to within about 14" of my subject while zoomed all the way in, which gives this lens a bit of a "macro" feature...not a true macro, but very nice for a mid-range zoom. Tamron used a lot of plastic on this lens to keep the weight down. It feels very solid to me. I'm not hard on my camera gear, so I don't see that as a problem. Also, there is no image stabilization within the lens. I shot in all kinds of light and I admit that I've got a fairly steady hand, so that is not going to be an issue for me at all. And my camera body has some stabilization built in to it. For the money, you just can't beat this lens for your Sony E mount cameras. There is a reason that most photographers are giving this thing five stars. I'll let my images speak for themselves.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By volterr - Reviewed in the United States on June 5, 2020
Best value telephoto zoom lens for sony
I wanted to buy long zoom lens for my sony for a long time now. Sony 70-200/f2.8 was expensive and heavy for me. So I was thinking about buying 70-200/f4, but when I saw first reviews showing sharpness of this Tamron I decided to wait. I that was a right choice. With first images I was surprised with how sharp this lens is. It is also not much bigger than Tamron 28-75 that I also own (significantly heavier though, but that's to be expected). It doesn't have optical stabilization, which is good to have on telephoto lenses (in-body stabilization works better on smaller focal distances), but for the price and its versatility I expect it to be on my sony body a significant amount of time. And with the same 67mm filter diameter I don't have to buy new set of filters. Tamron wins my heart and my money once again! Update: after a few days I've noticed a sound as if something was loose inside the lens when shaken a bit. After some research I now know that its focusing mechanism that moves freely when camera is powered off (or lens is detached). This is due to this lens using electromagnetic coils to move focusing mechanism as oppose to servo motors. I would still recommend this lens as this doesn't affect picture quality or experience, but I wish they would come up with some solution to fix all moving parts when camera turns off.

Recent Reviews


5.0 out of 5 stars
By Johnny - Reviewed in the United States on May 27, 2020
Can the Tamron 70-180mm f2.8 lens compete with Sony at less than half the price?
I am a well known pro. In more than 30 years, I have never desired to use a non-Nikon, Canon or Sony lens. Until now. The Tamron 70-180mm f2.8 Di III VXD is a legitimate game changer. So much so that this lens was a major push for me to switch to Sony after 15 years with Canon. I have depended on all the 70-200mm f2.8 lenses from Canon, Nikon and Sony. (See photo) This is my favorite telephoto zoom length and I own several. Yet, with all being fine performers, until now my most used lens in this focal length has been Canon’s slower 70-200 f4 IS lens. Why? WEIGHT COMPARISONS: TAMRON VS. SONY VS. CANON VS. NIKON For me, shooting comfort and non-fatiguing weight are high priorities when reaching for the the right lens for the job. The Canon 70-200 f4 IS is much more comfortable to hold than their 70-200 2.8 IS II at a quite tiring 53 ounces. When I needed the extra f-stop of light, I would grudgingly pull out my oh-so-heavy Canon 2.8. Sony’s 70-200 is astoundingly sharp at a similar weight of 52 ounces. Enter the $1,200 Tamron: Wowza! Tamron’s newly released 70-180 f2.8 lens weighs just 28.6 ounces—easier to maneuver than my beloved Canon f4 that only captures half the light. Since this Tamron is engineered specifically for the Sony FE mount, when you compare f2.8 zooms: Tamron’s is 45% lighter than the Sony. ARE THE LATEST CANON AND NIKON MIRRORLESS LENSES EVEN LIGHTER THAN TAMRON? Nope. Canon’s recently released RF 70-200 f2.8 is less hefty than earlier models at 37 ounces but costs $2,700. The just released Nikon Z 70-200 f2.8 weighs a clunky 53 ounces and is priced at $2,600. MOST IMPORTANT: IS THE TAMRON AS SHARP AS SONY, CANON OR NIKON? That’s the crucial question I asked myself. This new Tamron design was engineered specifically for Sony. The Sony full frame lenses have been almost revolutionary in terms of sharpness as compared with Canon lenses, previously heralded as the world’s best. One great push for me to go mirrorless is Sony’s superior optics. However, their 70-200 f4 isn’t as sharp as their great 2.8 and the Sony 2.8 is just as heavy as Canon’s EF version. When Tamron recently announced this new 70-180, several of us asked, “Is it too good to be true?” Without hesitation, I can say: It is indeed true. For any pro (or serious amateur), it’s all about razor sharpness when your own reputation is on the line. You can search and find excellent “pixel-peeping” reviews that are just as impressed with this new Tamron as I am. However, for me, it’s not about test charts and obscure coma and bokeh tests at 500%, but instead real world results and great, effortless images. To clarify, sharpness is the first must have quality. In the biz, we call this “tack sharp” and I am super impressed. I’m finding that using Sony’s AF-C mode works really well. The EYE-AF tracking setting is also extraordinarily quick and effective. Shooting comfort is of such primary importance that I was not ready to switch to Sony without an easier to handle solution in this focal range. The Tamron 70-180 f2.8 is just as sharp as the Sony 70-200 f2.8 while being far easier to handle. And, in several of my head to head tests, sharper yet. It’s that good. (The bokeh is just fine, by the way.) THE TAMRON HAS NO BUILT IN IMAGE STABILIZATION. DOES THIS MATTER? In everyday shooting, not really. Image stabilization was a “gotta have it” feature for telephoto zooms in the days before IBIS camera bodies. To keep both price and lens weight down, this Tamron was smartly designed without Vibration Compensation (VC) to take advantage of Sony’s stabilized full frame bodies. With Sony’s IBIS, I can hand hold this lens at 1/30th of a second with a reasonably good keeper rate. Losing lens stabilization in exchange for a fantastic maximum aperture of f2.8 will allow a higher shutter speed and the ability to “stop action.” In this price range, typical f4 telephoto zooms will be strongly disadvantaged with moving subjects unless you double your camera’s ISO setting to let the equivalent amount of light to reach the camera’s sensor. In a direct comparison hand holding the Tamron vs the Sony 70-200 f2.8 at lowest shutter speeds, I found that Sony has a slight edge, due to the combination of in camera IBIS and stabilization also built in to the lens. However, in camera IBIS does a great job with the Tamron and I’m quite satisfied. In real world use, I would rarely seek shutter speeds under 1/60th with a telephoto zoom anyway. The Sony 70-200 f2.8 is also a truly terrific five-star lens but at the cost of 45% more weight and an additional $1,400. I do get tired holding it. IS THE TAMRON DISADVANTAGED BY ONLY REACHING 180MM INSTEAD OF 200MM? In answering this question, I’m somewhat biased. 180 is my favorite telephoto focal length. For many years as a Nikon shooter, I used my (non-stabilized) 180 f2.8 almost as much as my 24mm, a fave wide choice. So, for the Tamron to reach an equivalent of 200mm like the Sony, I simply take one large step closer. Simple and effective. NEWS FLASH . . . WOULD YOU ALSO LOVE TO HAVE A NEW 105-270 f 2.8 TAMRON ZOOM? Huh, you say?? I first worried Sony’s huge 61 megapixel file size in the A7R IV might be a disadvantage. I have quickly learned it’s actually a big time game changer in terms of telephoto reach. Just pop on the Tamron zoom, customize one of the camera buttons to quickly change the camera to APS-C crop mode, and you have an instant 105-270 f2.8 lens with zero loss in sharpness! Unlike teleconverters, you do not lose one f-stop of light. What do you lose? The file size reduces from 61MP to 27MP—still a huge file big enough for a super sharp billboard sized advertisement. My most recent Canon camera, the wonderful pro 5D Mark IV, is beloved by pros. Its maximum file size is 30 megapixels, virtually the same as the Sony A7R IV set to APS-C crop mode. For other Sony a7 full frame models, first determine your original max file size: typically 42MP or 24MP. When switching into APS-C crop mode, you are also left with a quite good sized file. For example: A7R III=18MP in crop mode while A7 III=11MP in crop mode. By the way, have you priced a 300mm f2.8 lens lately? $6,000 and up compared to this Tamron at $1,199. I own an excellent Nikon 300 f2.8. This Tamron yields a 270mm f2.8 in APS-C mode that is as crisp as my legendary Nikkor. CAN YOU BUY A TELECONVERTER SPECIFICALLY FOR THIS TAMRON? Unfortunately, no. I hope Tamron will develop one. That’s one advantage the dedicated 70-200mm f2.8 lenses have. They do accommodate teleconverters but at the cost of losing one f-stop worth of light when using a 1.4X version. Thus, a 2.8 lens becomes an f4 when adding the teleconverter to the back of the lens. However, as of the date of this review, no other camera brand yet has a relatively affordable 61MP camera that allows the option to have a 2.8 lens without need for teleconverter (as long as you switch to APS-C mode). CONCLUSION: Is this a glowing review? You betcha. Minor tradeoffs for major advantages is a deal I’ll take every time. Focus is quick and “hunting” is rare. This is my first Tamron but I have a feeling it won’t be my last. It features good build quality for all but the harshest of shooting conditions. If you were to repaint this sleek Tamron white, rebrand as “Sony” and double the price, you’d still have a fantastic lens that focuses fast. You may recall that above I described the Sony version as “astoundingly sharp.” The Tamron 70-180mm f2.8 Di III VXD is a wee bit sharper yet. Hope this long review has been of some small help. HAPPY SHOOTING!

5.0 out of 5 stars
By juan - Reviewed in the United States on May 17, 2020
Best investment if you are a Sony shooter
I got mine today and just spent two hours testing this lens outside on a cloudy day. The autofocus is super fast, the picture quality is in part with the Sony 70-200/2.8, but the best thing about his lens is its weight and size (also the price). All I can say is if you are invested in Sony this is probably the lens to get right now.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By JJ - Reviewed in the United States on July 6, 2020
WOW
After a lifetime of shooting with Canon cameras, I recently switched to the Sony mirrorless system with a Sony a9. With a Sigma lens adapter, I can still use my amazing Canon lenses, but being that they are non-native lenses to the Sony, they work for stationary and slow to medium moving subjects. The Canon lenses can't keep up with the fast action that the Sony a9 camera body is so famous for. So I knew that a few new lenses need to be added. I've spent enough time behind a camera to know pretty quickly whether a lens is working for me or not. After testing several Sony lenses that were lack-luster and were returned, I decided to give this one a try. I have the equivalent of this lens from Canon. And it is the finest lens that I own. To my shock and amazement, this little gem of Tamron's is exceeding my expectations. It's about half the weight, half the size and a fraction of the price of my equivalent Canon lens. Why did I need this if I already have the Canon 2.8 lens you ask? Because I have no interest in hiking, walking and exploring long distances with a lens the size and weight of a sewer pipe hanging around my neck. This little Tamron is the perfect hiking companion. It is much more of a "walk-about" lens than my Canon one is. For me there are two things that I look for in any camera lens. A: Sharpness B: Consistency of performance. This lens aces both. I will pay more for these qualities, but in this case, you don't have to. The fixed 2.8 aperture is such an amazing thing to have in a lens and this lens syncs up with my Sony a9 perfectly. There is a slight "clunking" sound when the lens focuses, but with the reading that I've done, this is normal, so it's fine. I've found that I can get to within about 14" of my subject while zoomed all the way in, which gives this lens a bit of a "macro" feature...not a true macro, but very nice for a mid-range zoom. Tamron used a lot of plastic on this lens to keep the weight down. It feels very solid to me. I'm not hard on my camera gear, so I don't see that as a problem. Also, there is no image stabilization within the lens. I shot in all kinds of light and I admit that I've got a fairly steady hand, so that is not going to be an issue for me at all. And my camera body has some stabilization built in to it. For the money, you just can't beat this lens for your Sony E mount cameras. There is a reason that most photographers are giving this thing five stars. I'll let my images speak for themselves.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By volterr - Reviewed in the United States on June 5, 2020
Best value telephoto zoom lens for sony
I wanted to buy long zoom lens for my sony for a long time now. Sony 70-200/f2.8 was expensive and heavy for me. So I was thinking about buying 70-200/f4, but when I saw first reviews showing sharpness of this Tamron I decided to wait. I that was a right choice. With first images I was surprised with how sharp this lens is. It is also not much bigger than Tamron 28-75 that I also own (significantly heavier though, but that's to be expected). It doesn't have optical stabilization, which is good to have on telephoto lenses (in-body stabilization works better on smaller focal distances), but for the price and its versatility I expect it to be on my sony body a significant amount of time. And with the same 67mm filter diameter I don't have to buy new set of filters. Tamron wins my heart and my money once again! Update: after a few days I've noticed a sound as if something was loose inside the lens when shaken a bit. After some research I now know that its focusing mechanism that moves freely when camera is powered off (or lens is detached). This is due to this lens using electromagnetic coils to move focusing mechanism as oppose to servo motors. I would still recommend this lens as this doesn't affect picture quality or experience, but I wish they would come up with some solution to fix all moving parts when camera turns off.