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Xtreme Signal Long Range Yagi Style VHF/UHF HDTV Antenna (HDB91X)
Xtreme Signal Long Range Yagi Style VHF/UHF HDTV Antenna (HDB91X)

Xtreme Signal Long Range Yagi Style VHF/UHF HDTV Antenna (HDB91X)

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Xtreme Signal Long Range Yagi Style VHF/UHF HDTV Antenna (HDB91X)
Xtreme Signal Long Range Yagi Style VHF/UHF HDTV Antenna (HDB91X)
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Style: 70 Mile


Features

  • High-gain design allows for 70+ miles reception for UHF and 25 Miles for High Band VHF ensuring you get the most free HD broadcasts for your area
  • Mounting hardware is compatible with masts 1.6" outer diameter and smaller. Also allows you to adjust antenna angle
  • Uses built-in transformer for direct 75 ohm (coax) connection, that is more weather proof than the old style, pigtail transformer
  • Strong back reflector reduces interference from the back giving you better overall signal
  • Covered by a 6 Month Limited Warranty

Description

Style:70 Mile The HDB91X is the most powerful Xtreme Signal antenna. This Yagi style antennas is renowned for its high-gain design, directional reception, and its ability to block interference; making it ultimate choice for low- signal areas, or for those who simply want the best.


Product Dimensions: 31.5 x 15.15 x 23 inches


Item Weight: 4.5 pounds


Manufacturer: Signal Group, LLC


Item model number: HDB91X


Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: No


Date First Available: May 21, 2013


Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Unless otherwise stated above, most products arrive within 2-3 business days. Larger items may take 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Style: 70 Mile


Features

  • High-gain design allows for 70+ miles reception for UHF and 25 Miles for High Band VHF ensuring you get the most free HD broadcasts for your area
  • Mounting hardware is compatible with masts 1.6" outer diameter and smaller. Also allows you to adjust antenna angle
  • Uses built-in transformer for direct 75 ohm (coax) connection, that is more weather proof than the old style, pigtail transformer
  • Strong back reflector reduces interference from the back giving you better overall signal
  • Covered by a 6 Month Limited Warranty

Description

Style:70 Mile The HDB91X is the most powerful Xtreme Signal antenna. This Yagi style antennas is renowned for its high-gain design, directional reception, and its ability to block interference; making it ultimate choice for low- signal areas, or for those who simply want the best.


Product Dimensions: 31.5 x 15.15 x 23 inches


Item Weight: 4.5 pounds


Manufacturer: Signal Group, LLC


Item model number: HDB91X


Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: No


Date First Available: May 21, 2013


Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Unless otherwise stated above, most products arrive within 2-3 business days. Larger items may take 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Features

  • High-gain design allows for 70+ miles reception for UHF and 25 Miles for High Band VHF ensuring you get the most free HD broadcasts for your area
  • Mounting hardware is compatible with masts 1.6" outer diameter and smaller. Also allows you to adjust antenna angle
  • Uses built-in transformer for direct 75 ohm (coax) connection, that is more weather proof than the old style, pigtail transformer
  • Strong back reflector reduces interference from the back giving you better overall signal
  • Covered by a 6 Month Limited Warranty

Description

Style:70 Mile The HDB91X is the most powerful Xtreme Signal antenna. This Yagi style antennas is renowned for its high-gain design, directional reception, and its ability to block interference; making it ultimate choice for low- signal areas, or for those who simply want the best.


Product Dimensions: 31.5 x 15.15 x 23 inches


Item Weight: 4.5 pounds


Manufacturer: Signal Group, LLC


Item model number: HDB91X


Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: No


Date First Available: May 21, 2013


Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Orders placed now will arrive in 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Top Amazon Reviews


4.0 out of 5 stars
By dvsapp - Reviewed in the United States on July 6, 2017
From an installer.....
I install antennas as part of my business. I've ordered 50-75 of these over the last year, and overall it's a good antenna. Does real well with a good preamp. (60-75 miles). I've used the Winegard 8800HD and the Channel Master CM4228HD, which are quality antennas, but I've found this one outperforms them in most cases. I've had no failures/major issues with these HDB8X in the last 18 months. Build quality is pretty good compared to a lot of the stuff out there. Couple of things, however. The antenna lacks a locking system to hold its position if folded. You can tighten the wing nuts to hold it, but too tight and they'll snap off. I know... I had one on a 40-foot tower that moved after a major wind storm went though the area, I now set the angle, then drill a small hole in the movable bracket for a 8x1/2" screw. The wingnuts suck, I wish they'd just use standard bolts and nuts, I look real professional tightening stuff with a damned pliers, LOL! Get a tube of silicon grease and coat the fittings inside during assembly to weatherproof them. Same with the boots that go to the combiner. About 1 in 3 of every one of these I order, has bent reflector tubes, or holes in the box so that the some of loose hardware (screws and wingnuts) is missing- shipper issues for sure... Not really a deal-breaker, but extra work for me.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By morano75 - Reviewed in the United States on September 21, 2016
A worthy investment that exceeded my expectations
When purchasing an antenna, there are so many factors that have to be determined such as topology, distance to the transmitters, and various obstructions. With the advent of free HD tv and the addition of substations allowing more content, replacing your satellite or cable subscription with a reliable antenna and some streaming services to save some money are great investments. I happen to live where OTA content is abundant because of neighboring cities. My goal was to be able to capture channels running at various wattages from about 60 miles away. I also have local channels in the opposite direction about 25 miles away. Those are obtainable with run of the mill paper thin antennas, yet could not possibly reach the 60 mile destination. I had previously tried a highly priced and widely advertised 70 mile bay-type mounted on a 5 ft conduit pole for elevation. While it did a marvelous job at receiving stations omnidirectionally within a 50 mile radius, it just didn't have the power to hone in on my goal, even with a Wingard preamp. I was skeptical to begin with anyway. However, because I purchased that antenna locally, I knew I could return it if necessary. I returned it and opted for the tried and true yagi style knowing that I could get the long distance channels. However, I also figured that, without a rotor, my locals could be lost in the fray as typical yagis have difficulty with back reception. I reviewed the various brands out there and figured this one was worth the purchase. The construction of this antenna is solid. The elements were simple to unfold and snapped in place as expected. All other connections were seamless as well. The directions could use some typographical revisions, however, the pictures made up for that as a reference point throughout the process. Up on the conduit with a 50ft RG 6 new run of cable and a lot of finger crossing along the way. This antenna achieved my goal of 60 miles without hesitation. It is also able to bring in my locals from the opposite direction with surprising clarity. This added plus means I don't need a rotor or separate short range antenna. It has held up very well so far, including a couple of severe thunderstorms and heavy wind. I believe this will be durable throughout seasons and last for a long time. Taking into consideration its current price point, durable construction, and solid features, this antenna should be on your radar. There are plenty of manufacturers, designs, and advertising claims out there. After sifting through all the information, I decided to give this one a go and am very pleased with the decision!

3.0 out of 5 stars
By Witchhawk - Reviewed in the United States on February 7, 2016
Did Not Work For Me
My plan was to replace a 2 - bay antenna with this one in order to get a little better reception or possibly more channels. After trying several different mounting heights, aiming directions, etc. this antenna performed no where near as well as my older 2 - bay from "the shack". I ended up selling this one on "the list" and going back to using the 2- bay with a mast mount pre-amp. I know that antennas are finicky, and here are some things I have noticed over the years: DO NOT believe for one minute the age old advice of "put the antenna as high as possible". This advice is simply not true in all cases. Sure, if for some reason you have absolutely straight, unimpeded line of sight to the transmitting antennas this might work. However, in the real world signals bounce and deflect all over the place. Your antenna needs to be where the signals are, and the signals might not be coming to you from one definite direction. In my case, I get very poor signal strength with my antenna mounted at the top of the mast. Way up there the antenna is clear of most surrounding rooftops or obstructions, aimed precisely towards the transmitters, and about 30' above the ground. Sounds like the perfect antenna set up, but it is not. I found, through much trial and error, that I get the best signal from all stations with the antenna mounted halfway down the mast, almost level with the rooftop, with several taller buildings between my antenna and the transmitters. From a design standpoint, it "looks" like my antenna should not be able to pick up any signals, but it works better here than anywhere else. My point is, over the air signals are anything but definite and your antenna needs to be where the best signals actually exist - and there is no formula for that. When you install your outside antenna don't just go with "get it up as high as possible and aim it here". Have a partner watch the signal strength on the tv and move the antenna around before you lock it down. Move it up, move it down, turn it to and fro - even turn it backwards! Find the location that gives you the best signal on the most channels, snug it down, and most importantly - walk away from the antenna and mast before deciding on a final location. Someone holding (touching) the antenna, cable, or mast will affect the signal. Yes, it may be time consuming and it may be difficult but it can be done and it can be done by yourself. Take the time to get your antenna to where the signals really are and you won't be disappointed down the road. Hope this helps!

Top Reviews


4.0 out of 5 stars
By dvsapp - Reviewed in the United States on July 6, 2017
From an installer.....
I install antennas as part of my business. I've ordered 50-75 of these over the last year, and overall it's a good antenna. Does real well with a good preamp. (60-75 miles). I've used the Winegard 8800HD and the Channel Master CM4228HD, which are quality antennas, but I've found this one outperforms them in most cases. I've had no failures/major issues with these HDB8X in the last 18 months. Build quality is pretty good compared to a lot of the stuff out there. Couple of things, however. The antenna lacks a locking system to hold its position if folded. You can tighten the wing nuts to hold it, but too tight and they'll snap off. I know... I had one on a 40-foot tower that moved after a major wind storm went though the area, I now set the angle, then drill a small hole in the movable bracket for a 8x1/2" screw. The wingnuts suck, I wish they'd just use standard bolts and nuts, I look real professional tightening stuff with a damned pliers, LOL! Get a tube of silicon grease and coat the fittings inside during assembly to weatherproof them. Same with the boots that go to the combiner. About 1 in 3 of every one of these I order, has bent reflector tubes, or holes in the box so that the some of loose hardware (screws and wingnuts) is missing- shipper issues for sure... Not really a deal-breaker, but extra work for me.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By morano75 - Reviewed in the United States on September 21, 2016
A worthy investment that exceeded my expectations
When purchasing an antenna, there are so many factors that have to be determined such as topology, distance to the transmitters, and various obstructions. With the advent of free HD tv and the addition of substations allowing more content, replacing your satellite or cable subscription with a reliable antenna and some streaming services to save some money are great investments. I happen to live where OTA content is abundant because of neighboring cities. My goal was to be able to capture channels running at various wattages from about 60 miles away. I also have local channels in the opposite direction about 25 miles away. Those are obtainable with run of the mill paper thin antennas, yet could not possibly reach the 60 mile destination. I had previously tried a highly priced and widely advertised 70 mile bay-type mounted on a 5 ft conduit pole for elevation. While it did a marvelous job at receiving stations omnidirectionally within a 50 mile radius, it just didn't have the power to hone in on my goal, even with a Wingard preamp. I was skeptical to begin with anyway. However, because I purchased that antenna locally, I knew I could return it if necessary. I returned it and opted for the tried and true yagi style knowing that I could get the long distance channels. However, I also figured that, without a rotor, my locals could be lost in the fray as typical yagis have difficulty with back reception. I reviewed the various brands out there and figured this one was worth the purchase. The construction of this antenna is solid. The elements were simple to unfold and snapped in place as expected. All other connections were seamless as well. The directions could use some typographical revisions, however, the pictures made up for that as a reference point throughout the process. Up on the conduit with a 50ft RG 6 new run of cable and a lot of finger crossing along the way. This antenna achieved my goal of 60 miles without hesitation. It is also able to bring in my locals from the opposite direction with surprising clarity. This added plus means I don't need a rotor or separate short range antenna. It has held up very well so far, including a couple of severe thunderstorms and heavy wind. I believe this will be durable throughout seasons and last for a long time. Taking into consideration its current price point, durable construction, and solid features, this antenna should be on your radar. There are plenty of manufacturers, designs, and advertising claims out there. After sifting through all the information, I decided to give this one a go and am very pleased with the decision!

3.0 out of 5 stars
By Witchhawk - Reviewed in the United States on February 7, 2016
Did Not Work For Me
My plan was to replace a 2 - bay antenna with this one in order to get a little better reception or possibly more channels. After trying several different mounting heights, aiming directions, etc. this antenna performed no where near as well as my older 2 - bay from "the shack". I ended up selling this one on "the list" and going back to using the 2- bay with a mast mount pre-amp. I know that antennas are finicky, and here are some things I have noticed over the years: DO NOT believe for one minute the age old advice of "put the antenna as high as possible". This advice is simply not true in all cases. Sure, if for some reason you have absolutely straight, unimpeded line of sight to the transmitting antennas this might work. However, in the real world signals bounce and deflect all over the place. Your antenna needs to be where the signals are, and the signals might not be coming to you from one definite direction. In my case, I get very poor signal strength with my antenna mounted at the top of the mast. Way up there the antenna is clear of most surrounding rooftops or obstructions, aimed precisely towards the transmitters, and about 30' above the ground. Sounds like the perfect antenna set up, but it is not. I found, through much trial and error, that I get the best signal from all stations with the antenna mounted halfway down the mast, almost level with the rooftop, with several taller buildings between my antenna and the transmitters. From a design standpoint, it "looks" like my antenna should not be able to pick up any signals, but it works better here than anywhere else. My point is, over the air signals are anything but definite and your antenna needs to be where the best signals actually exist - and there is no formula for that. When you install your outside antenna don't just go with "get it up as high as possible and aim it here". Have a partner watch the signal strength on the tv and move the antenna around before you lock it down. Move it up, move it down, turn it to and fro - even turn it backwards! Find the location that gives you the best signal on the most channels, snug it down, and most importantly - walk away from the antenna and mast before deciding on a final location. Someone holding (touching) the antenna, cable, or mast will affect the signal. Yes, it may be time consuming and it may be difficult but it can be done and it can be done by yourself. Take the time to get your antenna to where the signals really are and you won't be disappointed down the road. Hope this helps!