That product is currently unavailable. Please try a different product or contact us for help.
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)

Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)

Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
Sony α7R IV Full-frame Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (ILCE7RM4/B)
$3,847.80
$3,517.80
Checking for changes Product info up-to-date Product info updated We've detected that this product is out of stock. Enter your email below and we will notify you when it is available.
Buy Now, Pay Later
As low as $ / mo
- month term
- No impact on credit score
- Quick & easy checkout
- Legal stuff:
Promotional Offer
Estimations exclude tax, and assume no other Klarna balances. Non-promotional balances have a 19.99% APR and a $2 monthly minimum interest charge. Accounts are subject to credit approval, and issued by WebBank, member FDIC.

Free shipping on this product


Availability: Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Fulfilled by Amazon


Get it by Sunday, Jul 5
Order within 7 hr 2 min

Features

  • Stunning resolution: world’s first 61MP full frame 35 millimeter back illuminated Exmor R CMOS Image Sensor
  • High speed: up to 10Fps continuous shooting at 61MP with AE/AF tracking; 26.2MP in APS C crop mode
  • Fast Hybrid Autofocus: 567 Phase detection AF points and 425 contrast AF points to cover more area
  • Advanced subject recognition: real time tracking and real time eye AF for humans, animals and movies
  • Accurate color reproduction: 15 stop dynamic Range at low sensitivities for greater Color accuracy
  • Incredible detail: see fine details with area specific noise reduction from Sony BIONZ X processor
  • 4K video: full pixel readout without binning in super 35 millimeter mode; S log and HLG recording features

Description

Thanks to an evolutionary leap in image processing power and efficiency, the Sony a7R IV combines a high-resolution 61MP back-illuminated Exmore R CMOS image sensor with impressive shooting speeds of up to 10 fps with full AF/AE tracking, as well as beautiful 4K HDR video, wide 15-stop dynamic range, and high sensitivity with area-specific noise reduction of almost a full stop.


Product Dimensions 5.13 x 3.88 x 3.13 inches


Item Weight 1.27 pounds


ASIN B07VGHW91J


Item model number ILCE7RM4/B


Batteries 1 Lithium ion batteries required. (included)


Customer Reviews 4.4 out of 5 stars 71 ratings 4.4 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #14,637 in Electronics (See Top 100 in Electronics) #30 in Mirrorless Cameras


Date First Available July 18, 2019


Manufacturer Sony


Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Unless otherwise stated above, most products arrive within 2-3 business days. Larger items may take 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Features

  • Stunning resolution: world’s first 61MP full frame 35 millimeter back illuminated Exmor R CMOS Image Sensor
  • High speed: up to 10Fps continuous shooting at 61MP with AE/AF tracking; 26.2MP in APS C crop mode
  • Fast Hybrid Autofocus: 567 Phase detection AF points and 425 contrast AF points to cover more area
  • Advanced subject recognition: real time tracking and real time eye AF for humans, animals and movies
  • Accurate color reproduction: 15 stop dynamic Range at low sensitivities for greater Color accuracy
  • Incredible detail: see fine details with area specific noise reduction from Sony BIONZ X processor
  • 4K video: full pixel readout without binning in super 35 millimeter mode; S log and HLG recording features

Description

Thanks to an evolutionary leap in image processing power and efficiency, the Sony a7R IV combines a high-resolution 61MP back-illuminated Exmore R CMOS image sensor with impressive shooting speeds of up to 10 fps with full AF/AE tracking, as well as beautiful 4K HDR video, wide 15-stop dynamic range, and high sensitivity with area-specific noise reduction of almost a full stop.


Product Dimensions 5.13 x 3.88 x 3.13 inches


Item Weight 1.27 pounds


ASIN B07VGHW91J


Item model number ILCE7RM4/B


Batteries 1 Lithium ion batteries required. (included)


Customer Reviews 4.4 out of 5 stars 71 ratings 4.4 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #14,637 in Electronics (See Top 100 in Electronics) #30 in Mirrorless Cameras


Date First Available July 18, 2019


Manufacturer Sony


Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Unless otherwise stated above, most products arrive within 2-3 business days. Larger items may take 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Features

  • Stunning resolution: world’s first 61MP full frame 35 millimeter back illuminated Exmor R CMOS Image Sensor
  • High speed: up to 10Fps continuous shooting at 61MP with AE/AF tracking; 26.2MP in APS C crop mode
  • Fast Hybrid Autofocus: 567 Phase detection AF points and 425 contrast AF points to cover more area
  • Advanced subject recognition: real time tracking and real time eye AF for humans, animals and movies
  • Accurate color reproduction: 15 stop dynamic Range at low sensitivities for greater Color accuracy
  • Incredible detail: see fine details with area specific noise reduction from Sony BIONZ X processor
  • 4K video: full pixel readout without binning in super 35 millimeter mode; S log and HLG recording features

Description

Thanks to an evolutionary leap in image processing power and efficiency, the Sony a7R IV combines a high-resolution 61MP back-illuminated Exmore R CMOS image sensor with impressive shooting speeds of up to 10 fps with full AF/AE tracking, as well as beautiful 4K HDR video, wide 15-stop dynamic range, and high sensitivity with area-specific noise reduction of almost a full stop.


Product Dimensions 5.13 x 3.88 x 3.13 inches


Item Weight 1.27 pounds


ASIN B07VGHW91J


Item model number ILCE7RM4/B


Batteries 1 Lithium ion batteries required. (included)


Customer Reviews 4.4 out of 5 stars 71 ratings 4.4 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #14,637 in Electronics (See Top 100 in Electronics) #30 in Mirrorless Cameras


Date First Available July 18, 2019


Manufacturer Sony


abunda_amazon_reviews If you’ve come here you already know what most of the world knows: Sony makes class-leading image sensors and very good cameras. I upgraded from the Sony A7R III. Was it worth it? Maybe. Is it worth upgrading from a Sony A7 III? No, wait to see what the A7 IV is like! If you’re coming from almost any other Sony A7-series camera (except the S series which Sony seems to not care about anymore, which is sad), this is definitely worth a serious look. I’m going to review this mainly from the perspective of someone coming from the A7R III. What’s better (in order of importance): - Ergonomics: the new grip has to be held to be believed! The camera feels so much more secure when shooting one-handed. Another bonus: many of the other buttons are noticeably taller and clickier. This makes the camera WAY EASIER to operate with big gloves on. Since I live in Alaska, this is HUGE for my use cases. I also broke the card door on my A7R III because I looked at it wrong. The card door here has been re-engineer to be much more durable and rugged. I also love that you can lock the exposure compensation dial. Something I never realized I needed till I had it. - The EVF: it’s way sharper. It looks more real than real life. EVF’s are finally starting to approach OVF’s in visual fidelity. It’s impressive. It’s a joy to review photos you’ve already taken on it. Warning: do this in public and people will think you’re a creeper. - Weather sealing: personally, I didn’t have issues shooting with even the old A7R II in the rain and snow. However, many people did. The seals on this are better than any A7 camera before it. Just make sure your lens is also sealed! - Auto-focus: this is something that’s hard to objectively test, but the tracking does seem snappier. Also, it can do eye-AF during video now, which is incredible if you like to interview people at big apertures. - DUAL UHS-II card slots: FINALLY! On the III, one of the card slots is gimped to UHS-I speeds. What this means is: if you want to shoot redundantly (write the photo to both cards) you bottleneck your entire camera to the speed of the slower slot. To get around this, I just designated the slow slot as video-only. - The USB-C port is much faster for DATA transfer: transferring files directly from the camera is now a reality, the USB-C dream has (almost: more on that below) come true. (EDIT: update, apparently only on Sony's software. Imports to Lightroom are still very slow. I still recommend using a card reader) - Detail: there is noticeably more detail in this sensor, if you shoot it right. There are LOTS of caveats though (see below) What’s the same: - Battery: same battery as the last model, and as the A7 III. This means if you bought some extras and are upgrading, you are ready to roll! It has a slightly higher total shots rating in this camera, but it’s probably not worth getting too excited about. - File burden: while these files are definitely bigger, editing them in Lightroom doesn’t feel any more sluggish than the files from the III version. Don’t believe the hype. (my computer: 2016 15” Macbook Pro) My recommended work flow: shoot uncompressed RAW. When you import them into Lightroom, convert them to .DNG. This will give you a losslessly compressed RAW file. - Noise: if you resize both images to the same size, noise is very close. - Dynamic Range: hard to test objectively, but “feels” similar in character to the III version. (Sony quotes both at 15 stops) - Menu system: it’s still Sony, it’s still bad. Luckily the camera is still absurdly customizable so once you get it setup, you won’t have to wade into them very often. - USB-C port for charging speed: you can still charge it via USB-C and it’s still really slow. I’m not sure what the wattage is, but given that Sony says the micro-USB port charges at the same speed, I’d guess it’s around 10W. USB-C can go all the way up to 100W. I’m not asking for that much, but 30W would make a meaningful difference. - Video quality: still no 10-bit video or 4k/60fps in a brand new 2019 camera is shameful. The last 3 iPhones have been able to do the latter. Sony says this can do “HDR” video, but it’s a marketing lie. There is no such thing as 8-bit HDR anymore than there is single-speaker “stereo” sound. The phrase makes no sense. It’s especially painful with the S-version getting left behind at version II. What’s worse: - Still no lossless RAW compression: c’mon Sony! The only RAW options are lossy compressed RAW (good 99% of the time, but I’m often in the 1%: astrophotography) and completely uncompressed RAW (massive files). I’ve found a work-around (see the same segment above), but it would be nice to not have to do this. This is one area where Canon/Nikon are way better. They have had lossless RAW compression for at least a decade! - Detail: yep, it’s also a negative. To wring all that extra detail out of the sensor, you’re going to need: o Good lenses: they’ve been warning us about this for years, and for years it’s been just that: an empty warning. It actually makes a difference for this sensor. I’d recommend moderately-priced primes or expensive (f/2.8) zooms. o Fast shutter speeds: to hand-hold, I’d recommend at LEAST 1/3*focal length shutter speed to guarantee a sharp photo. So if you’re shooting at 100mm, that would mean 1/300th s. It sounds absurd but, if you like to zoom into 100% on your photos, you’ll notice some detail blurring as you push it closer to the old school 1/focal length rule. The other option is to lug a tripod. o Low ISO’s: as you get further above ISO 100, the difference in detail rendered between this and the A7R III sensor starts to vanish. Once you’re in the 3200 range, the noise to detail ratio looks about the same. - Noise: what, this is also a negative? If you view these files at 100% and view the A7R III files at 100%, this camera will look noisier. The advantage is when you scale it down to the size of the A7R III, the noise looks similar. (or, conversely, if you were to upscale the A7R III files to the size of the IV files) One more thing: the multi-shot modes for more detail are still very clunky. I was testing them out by shooting a mountain against a blue sky, and I always got weird cross-hatching visual artifacts. Sony's software needs to be able to compensate for minor movement. (I was on a tripod with a 2-second timer and they still got artifacts when merged) Overall thoughts: a great body. The ergonomics are the most impressive thing about this camera. They are rolling out the same body to the A9 II (announced today) and I’d expect the A7 IV will also have this body. If you use good glass and have great technique, or you like to shoot at f/8.0 on a tripod, there is a meaningful improvement in image detail. At its worst, the detail is the same as the III. Which, to be fair, is still very impressive. I know this doesn’t matter for most people, who will be buying this for stills-only, but the lack of 10-bit or 4k/60 really hurts. I’d love to not have to carry a second camera for video on mountaineering adventures. My theory for this is that Sony’s sensor designs are outgrowing their SoC/CPU designs.;;Reviewed in the United States on October 3, 2019;;4.0 out of 5 stars;;R & RII bodies: upgrade, RIII: maybe upgrade, Vanilla III: wait for vanilla IV, S bodies: I'm sorry;;IceIceClmbr;;;I am so disappointed that I am sending it back for a replacement. The camera is not focusing properly resulting in not being he sharpness one would expect. My Sony A7R II performs better. On the Facebook forums some others are experiencing similar issues. I even ran tests between the II and IV on a tripod and found similar results;;Reviewed in the United States on September 29, 2019;;1.0 out of 5 stars;;Focus is way off;;Allan;;;I too am disappointed and I am sending my A7R IV back for a replacement. The camera does not focus properly. Misses more than 80% of the shots taken. Doesn't matter ISO, shutter speed, aperture, lens, eye tracking, spot focus, tripod, etc: for almost all the pictures, the camera misses focus. Even though it's much slower at auto focus, my Sony A7R performs better. UPDATE: Changing to 3 stars: I have received a replacement A7R IV and the focus issues are gone. There is a real issue with this model not focusing for some units. Check out dpreview or other forums. If you have an issue with your unit, get it replaced!;;Reviewed in the United States on October 7, 2019;;3.0 out of 5 stars;;Focus is off;;Justin Morris;;;Sony A7R IV has the resolution, autofocus, speed, and form factor that should place it near the top ranks for Camera of the Year honors. A bit disappointed to see little work done on the camera's menu structure. The camera offers 14-bit uncompressed Raw or compressed Raws that use Sony's potentially destructive compression. There's still no lossless or visually lossless compression option. There is no 4K/60p on the a7R IV but the camera remains a strictly 8-bit video camera. Most rivals now offer 10-bit capture or output: something that gives a significant boost in terms of editing flexibility to Log footage, so it's odd not to see it here. Rather than resolving existing quirks and foibles, Sony is more focused on adding attention-grabbing new features and, to be fair, Full-time Eye AF / Full-time Tracking are very impressive.;;Reviewed in the United States on September 28, 2019;;5.0 out of 5 stars;;Another Milestone from Sony;;Kanchis;;;Amazing quality of images straight out of camera . I have not used it for wild life yet but took some great landscape and portraits with it. Difference in quality of images is obvious when compared to 7R III . Also made a switch from Nikon D810 entire set up . I am happy I made that decision. Recommend following lenses with it . Sony 16-35 mm f 2.8 (Landscape) Sony 50 mm 1.4 ( portraits) two person Sony 85 mm 1.8 ( portraits) one person close shots Sony 100-40 mm (Wild life);;Reviewed in the United States on October 8, 2019;;5.0 out of 5 stars;;Amazing quality of images when compared to 7R III;;M. Furqan;;;I received the item tested with two different Sony Lenses. Unfortunately the A7R IV I received must be a DEFECTIVE unit. Two ISSUES I have experience consistently with the A7R IV. 1 - Autofocus Accuracy. ( Still or Moving Subjects ) the A7R IV I received did not deliver. 2 - Camera becomes Unresponsive. I was looking forward to the newly *redesign and improve* Sony A7R IV and yet nothing less than EXCELLENCE merits ownership. I'm.... DISSAPOINTED;;Reviewed in the United States on November 16, 2019;;1.0 out of 5 stars;;AUTOFOCUS ACCURACY.....ISSUES **** CAMERA BECOMES UNRESPONSIVE.;;LECLE

Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Orders placed now will arrive in 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Top Amazon Reviews


4.0 out of 5 stars
By IceIceClmbr - Reviewed in the United States on October 3, 2019
R & RII bodies: upgrade, RIII: maybe upgrade, Vanilla III: wait for vanilla IV, S bodies: I'm sorry
If you’ve come here you already know what most of the world knows: Sony makes class-leading image sensors and very good cameras. I upgraded from the Sony A7R III. Was it worth it? Maybe. Is it worth upgrading from a Sony A7 III? No, wait to see what the A7 IV is like! If you’re coming from almost any other Sony A7-series camera (except the S series which Sony seems to not care about anymore, which is sad), this is definitely worth a serious look. I’m going to review this mainly from the perspective of someone coming from the A7R III. What’s better (in order of importance): - Ergonomics: the new grip has to be held to be believed! The camera feels so much more secure when shooting one-handed. Another bonus: many of the other buttons are noticeably taller and clickier. This makes the camera WAY EASIER to operate with big gloves on. Since I live in Alaska, this is HUGE for my use cases. I also broke the card door on my A7R III because I looked at it wrong. The card door here has been re-engineer to be much more durable and rugged. I also love that you can lock the exposure compensation dial. Something I never realized I needed till I had it. - The EVF: it’s way sharper. It looks more real than real life. EVF’s are finally starting to approach OVF’s in visual fidelity. It’s impressive. It’s a joy to review photos you’ve already taken on it. Warning: do this in public and people will think you’re a creeper. - Weather sealing: personally, I didn’t have issues shooting with even the old A7R II in the rain and snow. However, many people did. The seals on this are better than any A7 camera before it. Just make sure your lens is also sealed! - Auto-focus: this is something that’s hard to objectively test, but the tracking does seem snappier. Also, it can do eye-AF during video now, which is incredible if you like to interview people at big apertures. - DUAL UHS-II card slots: FINALLY! On the III, one of the card slots is gimped to UHS-I speeds. What this means is: if you want to shoot redundantly (write the photo to both cards) you bottleneck your entire camera to the speed of the slower slot. To get around this, I just designated the slow slot as video-only. - The USB-C port is much faster for DATA transfer: transferring files directly from the camera is now a reality, the USB-C dream has (almost: more on that below) come true. (EDIT: update, apparently only on Sony's software. Imports to Lightroom are still very slow. I still recommend using a card reader) - Detail: there is noticeably more detail in this sensor, if you shoot it right. There are LOTS of caveats though (see below) What’s the same: - Battery: same battery as the last model, and as the A7 III. This means if you bought some extras and are upgrading, you are ready to roll! It has a slightly higher total shots rating in this camera, but it’s probably not worth getting too excited about. - File burden: while these files are definitely bigger, editing them in Lightroom doesn’t feel any more sluggish than the files from the III version. Don’t believe the hype. (my computer: 2016 15” Macbook Pro) My recommended work flow: shoot uncompressed RAW. When you import them into Lightroom, convert them to .DNG. This will give you a losslessly compressed RAW file. - Noise: if you resize both images to the same size, noise is very close. - Dynamic Range: hard to test objectively, but “feels” similar in character to the III version. (Sony quotes both at 15 stops) - Menu system: it’s still Sony, it’s still bad. Luckily the camera is still absurdly customizable so once you get it setup, you won’t have to wade into them very often. - USB-C port for charging speed: you can still charge it via USB-C and it’s still really slow. I’m not sure what the wattage is, but given that Sony says the micro-USB port charges at the same speed, I’d guess it’s around 10W. USB-C can go all the way up to 100W. I’m not asking for that much, but 30W would make a meaningful difference. - Video quality: still no 10-bit video or 4k/60fps in a brand new 2019 camera is shameful. The last 3 iPhones have been able to do the latter. Sony says this can do “HDR” video, but it’s a marketing lie. There is no such thing as 8-bit HDR anymore than there is single-speaker “stereo” sound. The phrase makes no sense. It’s especially painful with the S-version getting left behind at version II. What’s worse: - Still no lossless RAW compression: c’mon Sony! The only RAW options are lossy compressed RAW (good 99% of the time, but I’m often in the 1%: astrophotography) and completely uncompressed RAW (massive files). I’ve found a work-around (see the same segment above), but it would be nice to not have to do this. This is one area where Canon/Nikon are way better. They have had lossless RAW compression for at least a decade! - Detail: yep, it’s also a negative. To wring all that extra detail out of the sensor, you’re going to need: o Good lenses: they’ve been warning us about this for years, and for years it’s been just that: an empty warning. It actually makes a difference for this sensor. I’d recommend moderately-priced primes or expensive (f/2.8) zooms. o Fast shutter speeds: to hand-hold, I’d recommend at LEAST 1/3*focal length shutter speed to guarantee a sharp photo. So if you’re shooting at 100mm, that would mean 1/300th s. It sounds absurd but, if you like to zoom into 100% on your photos, you’ll notice some detail blurring as you push it closer to the old school 1/focal length rule. The other option is to lug a tripod. o Low ISO’s: as you get further above ISO 100, the difference in detail rendered between this and the A7R III sensor starts to vanish. Once you’re in the 3200 range, the noise to detail ratio looks about the same. - Noise: what, this is also a negative? If you view these files at 100% and view the A7R III files at 100%, this camera will look noisier. The advantage is when you scale it down to the size of the A7R III, the noise looks similar. (or, conversely, if you were to upscale the A7R III files to the size of the IV files) One more thing: the multi-shot modes for more detail are still very clunky. I was testing them out by shooting a mountain against a blue sky, and I always got weird cross-hatching visual artifacts. Sony's software needs to be able to compensate for minor movement. (I was on a tripod with a 2-second timer and they still got artifacts when merged) Overall thoughts: a great body. The ergonomics are the most impressive thing about this camera. They are rolling out the same body to the A9 II (announced today) and I’d expect the A7 IV will also have this body. If you use good glass and have great technique, or you like to shoot at f/8.0 on a tripod, there is a meaningful improvement in image detail. At its worst, the detail is the same as the III. Which, to be fair, is still very impressive. I know this doesn’t matter for most people, who will be buying this for stills-only, but the lack of 10-bit or 4k/60 really hurts. I’d love to not have to carry a second camera for video on mountaineering adventures. My theory for this is that Sony’s sensor designs are outgrowing their SoC/CPU designs.

1.0 out of 5 stars
By Allan - Reviewed in the United States on September 29, 2019
Focus is way off
I am so disappointed that I am sending it back for a replacement. The camera is not focusing properly resulting in not being he sharpness one would expect. My Sony A7R II performs better. On the Facebook forums some others are experiencing similar issues. I even ran tests between the II and IV on a tripod and found similar results

3.0 out of 5 stars
By Justin Morris - Reviewed in the United States on October 7, 2019
Focus is off
I too am disappointed and I am sending my A7R IV back for a replacement. The camera does not focus properly. Misses more than 80% of the shots taken. Doesn't matter ISO, shutter speed, aperture, lens, eye tracking, spot focus, tripod, etc: for almost all the pictures, the camera misses focus. Even though it's much slower at auto focus, my Sony A7R performs better. UPDATE: Changing to 3 stars: I have received a replacement A7R IV and the focus issues are gone. There is a real issue with this model not focusing for some units. Check out dpreview or other forums. If you have an issue with your unit, get it replaced!

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Kanchis - Reviewed in the United States on September 28, 2019
Another Milestone from Sony
Sony A7R IV has the resolution, autofocus, speed, and form factor that should place it near the top ranks for Camera of the Year honors. A bit disappointed to see little work done on the camera's menu structure. The camera offers 14-bit uncompressed Raw or compressed Raws that use Sony's potentially destructive compression. There's still no lossless or visually lossless compression option. There is no 4K/60p on the a7R IV but the camera remains a strictly 8-bit video camera. Most rivals now offer 10-bit capture or output: something that gives a significant boost in terms of editing flexibility to Log footage, so it's odd not to see it here. Rather than resolving existing quirks and foibles, Sony is more focused on adding attention-grabbing new features and, to be fair, Full-time Eye AF / Full-time Tracking are very impressive.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By M. Furqan - Reviewed in the United States on October 8, 2019
Amazing quality of images when compared to 7R III
Amazing quality of images straight out of camera . I have not used it for wild life yet but took some great landscape and portraits with it. Difference in quality of images is obvious when compared to 7R III . Also made a switch from Nikon D810 entire set up . I am happy I made that decision. Recommend following lenses with it . Sony 16-35 mm f 2.8 (Landscape) Sony 50 mm 1.4 ( portraits) two person Sony 85 mm 1.8 ( portraits) one person close shots Sony 100-40 mm (Wild life)

1.0 out of 5 stars
By LECLE - Reviewed in the United States on November 16, 2019
AUTOFOCUS ACCURACY.....ISSUES **** CAMERA BECOMES UNRESPONSIVE.
I received the item tested with two different Sony Lenses. Unfortunately the A7R IV I received must be a DEFECTIVE unit. Two ISSUES I have experience consistently with the A7R IV. 1 - Autofocus Accuracy. ( Still or Moving Subjects ) the A7R IV I received did not deliver. 2 - Camera becomes Unresponsive. I was looking forward to the newly *redesign and improve* Sony A7R IV and yet nothing less than EXCELLENCE merits ownership. I'm.... DISSAPOINTED

Recent Reviews


4.0 out of 5 stars
By IceIceClmbr - Reviewed in the United States on October 3, 2019
R & RII bodies: upgrade, RIII: maybe upgrade, Vanilla III: wait for vanilla IV, S bodies: I'm sorry
If you’ve come here you already know what most of the world knows: Sony makes class-leading image sensors and very good cameras. I upgraded from the Sony A7R III. Was it worth it? Maybe. Is it worth upgrading from a Sony A7 III? No, wait to see what the A7 IV is like! If you’re coming from almost any other Sony A7-series camera (except the S series which Sony seems to not care about anymore, which is sad), this is definitely worth a serious look. I’m going to review this mainly from the perspective of someone coming from the A7R III. What’s better (in order of importance): - Ergonomics: the new grip has to be held to be believed! The camera feels so much more secure when shooting one-handed. Another bonus: many of the other buttons are noticeably taller and clickier. This makes the camera WAY EASIER to operate with big gloves on. Since I live in Alaska, this is HUGE for my use cases. I also broke the card door on my A7R III because I looked at it wrong. The card door here has been re-engineer to be much more durable and rugged. I also love that you can lock the exposure compensation dial. Something I never realized I needed till I had it. - The EVF: it’s way sharper. It looks more real than real life. EVF’s are finally starting to approach OVF’s in visual fidelity. It’s impressive. It’s a joy to review photos you’ve already taken on it. Warning: do this in public and people will think you’re a creeper. - Weather sealing: personally, I didn’t have issues shooting with even the old A7R II in the rain and snow. However, many people did. The seals on this are better than any A7 camera before it. Just make sure your lens is also sealed! - Auto-focus: this is something that’s hard to objectively test, but the tracking does seem snappier. Also, it can do eye-AF during video now, which is incredible if you like to interview people at big apertures. - DUAL UHS-II card slots: FINALLY! On the III, one of the card slots is gimped to UHS-I speeds. What this means is: if you want to shoot redundantly (write the photo to both cards) you bottleneck your entire camera to the speed of the slower slot. To get around this, I just designated the slow slot as video-only. - The USB-C port is much faster for DATA transfer: transferring files directly from the camera is now a reality, the USB-C dream has (almost: more on that below) come true. (EDIT: update, apparently only on Sony's software. Imports to Lightroom are still very slow. I still recommend using a card reader) - Detail: there is noticeably more detail in this sensor, if you shoot it right. There are LOTS of caveats though (see below) What’s the same: - Battery: same battery as the last model, and as the A7 III. This means if you bought some extras and are upgrading, you are ready to roll! It has a slightly higher total shots rating in this camera, but it’s probably not worth getting too excited about. - File burden: while these files are definitely bigger, editing them in Lightroom doesn’t feel any more sluggish than the files from the III version. Don’t believe the hype. (my computer: 2016 15” Macbook Pro) My recommended work flow: shoot uncompressed RAW. When you import them into Lightroom, convert them to .DNG. This will give you a losslessly compressed RAW file. - Noise: if you resize both images to the same size, noise is very close. - Dynamic Range: hard to test objectively, but “feels” similar in character to the III version. (Sony quotes both at 15 stops) - Menu system: it’s still Sony, it’s still bad. Luckily the camera is still absurdly customizable so once you get it setup, you won’t have to wade into them very often. - USB-C port for charging speed: you can still charge it via USB-C and it’s still really slow. I’m not sure what the wattage is, but given that Sony says the micro-USB port charges at the same speed, I’d guess it’s around 10W. USB-C can go all the way up to 100W. I’m not asking for that much, but 30W would make a meaningful difference. - Video quality: still no 10-bit video or 4k/60fps in a brand new 2019 camera is shameful. The last 3 iPhones have been able to do the latter. Sony says this can do “HDR” video, but it’s a marketing lie. There is no such thing as 8-bit HDR anymore than there is single-speaker “stereo” sound. The phrase makes no sense. It’s especially painful with the S-version getting left behind at version II. What’s worse: - Still no lossless RAW compression: c’mon Sony! The only RAW options are lossy compressed RAW (good 99% of the time, but I’m often in the 1%: astrophotography) and completely uncompressed RAW (massive files). I’ve found a work-around (see the same segment above), but it would be nice to not have to do this. This is one area where Canon/Nikon are way better. They have had lossless RAW compression for at least a decade! - Detail: yep, it’s also a negative. To wring all that extra detail out of the sensor, you’re going to need: o Good lenses: they’ve been warning us about this for years, and for years it’s been just that: an empty warning. It actually makes a difference for this sensor. I’d recommend moderately-priced primes or expensive (f/2.8) zooms. o Fast shutter speeds: to hand-hold, I’d recommend at LEAST 1/3*focal length shutter speed to guarantee a sharp photo. So if you’re shooting at 100mm, that would mean 1/300th s. It sounds absurd but, if you like to zoom into 100% on your photos, you’ll notice some detail blurring as you push it closer to the old school 1/focal length rule. The other option is to lug a tripod. o Low ISO’s: as you get further above ISO 100, the difference in detail rendered between this and the A7R III sensor starts to vanish. Once you’re in the 3200 range, the noise to detail ratio looks about the same. - Noise: what, this is also a negative? If you view these files at 100% and view the A7R III files at 100%, this camera will look noisier. The advantage is when you scale it down to the size of the A7R III, the noise looks similar. (or, conversely, if you were to upscale the A7R III files to the size of the IV files) One more thing: the multi-shot modes for more detail are still very clunky. I was testing them out by shooting a mountain against a blue sky, and I always got weird cross-hatching visual artifacts. Sony's software needs to be able to compensate for minor movement. (I was on a tripod with a 2-second timer and they still got artifacts when merged) Overall thoughts: a great body. The ergonomics are the most impressive thing about this camera. They are rolling out the same body to the A9 II (announced today) and I’d expect the A7 IV will also have this body. If you use good glass and have great technique, or you like to shoot at f/8.0 on a tripod, there is a meaningful improvement in image detail. At its worst, the detail is the same as the III. Which, to be fair, is still very impressive. I know this doesn’t matter for most people, who will be buying this for stills-only, but the lack of 10-bit or 4k/60 really hurts. I’d love to not have to carry a second camera for video on mountaineering adventures. My theory for this is that Sony’s sensor designs are outgrowing their SoC/CPU designs.

1.0 out of 5 stars
By Allan - Reviewed in the United States on September 29, 2019
Focus is way off
I am so disappointed that I am sending it back for a replacement. The camera is not focusing properly resulting in not being he sharpness one would expect. My Sony A7R II performs better. On the Facebook forums some others are experiencing similar issues. I even ran tests between the II and IV on a tripod and found similar results

3.0 out of 5 stars
By Justin Morris - Reviewed in the United States on October 7, 2019
Focus is off
I too am disappointed and I am sending my A7R IV back for a replacement. The camera does not focus properly. Misses more than 80% of the shots taken. Doesn't matter ISO, shutter speed, aperture, lens, eye tracking, spot focus, tripod, etc: for almost all the pictures, the camera misses focus. Even though it's much slower at auto focus, my Sony A7R performs better. UPDATE: Changing to 3 stars: I have received a replacement A7R IV and the focus issues are gone. There is a real issue with this model not focusing for some units. Check out dpreview or other forums. If you have an issue with your unit, get it replaced!

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Kanchis - Reviewed in the United States on September 28, 2019
Another Milestone from Sony
Sony A7R IV has the resolution, autofocus, speed, and form factor that should place it near the top ranks for Camera of the Year honors. A bit disappointed to see little work done on the camera's menu structure. The camera offers 14-bit uncompressed Raw or compressed Raws that use Sony's potentially destructive compression. There's still no lossless or visually lossless compression option. There is no 4K/60p on the a7R IV but the camera remains a strictly 8-bit video camera. Most rivals now offer 10-bit capture or output: something that gives a significant boost in terms of editing flexibility to Log footage, so it's odd not to see it here. Rather than resolving existing quirks and foibles, Sony is more focused on adding attention-grabbing new features and, to be fair, Full-time Eye AF / Full-time Tracking are very impressive.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By M. Furqan - Reviewed in the United States on October 8, 2019
Amazing quality of images when compared to 7R III
Amazing quality of images straight out of camera . I have not used it for wild life yet but took some great landscape and portraits with it. Difference in quality of images is obvious when compared to 7R III . Also made a switch from Nikon D810 entire set up . I am happy I made that decision. Recommend following lenses with it . Sony 16-35 mm f 2.8 (Landscape) Sony 50 mm 1.4 ( portraits) two person Sony 85 mm 1.8 ( portraits) one person close shots Sony 100-40 mm (Wild life)

1.0 out of 5 stars
By LECLE - Reviewed in the United States on November 16, 2019
AUTOFOCUS ACCURACY.....ISSUES **** CAMERA BECOMES UNRESPONSIVE.
I received the item tested with two different Sony Lenses. Unfortunately the A7R IV I received must be a DEFECTIVE unit. Two ISSUES I have experience consistently with the A7R IV. 1 - Autofocus Accuracy. ( Still or Moving Subjects ) the A7R IV I received did not deliver. 2 - Camera becomes Unresponsive. I was looking forward to the newly *redesign and improve* Sony A7R IV and yet nothing less than EXCELLENCE merits ownership. I'm.... DISSAPOINTED