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Tiffen 77mm Variable Neutral Density Filter 77VND for Camera lenses,black
Tiffen 77mm Variable Neutral Density Filter 77VND for Camera lenses,black
Tiffen 77mm Variable Neutral Density Filter 77VND for Camera lenses,black
Tiffen 77mm Variable Neutral Density Filter 77VND for Camera lenses,black
Tiffen 77mm Variable Neutral Density Filter 77VND for Camera lenses,black
Tiffen 77mm Variable Neutral Density Filter 77VND for Camera lenses,black

Tiffen 77mm Variable Neutral Density Filter 77VND for Camera lenses,black

Tiffen 77mm Variable Neutral Density Filter 77VND for Camera lenses,black
Tiffen 77mm Variable Neutral Density Filter 77VND for Camera lenses,black
Tiffen 77mm Variable Neutral Density Filter 77VND for Camera lenses,black
Tiffen 77mm Variable Neutral Density Filter 77VND for Camera lenses,black
Tiffen 77mm Variable Neutral Density Filter 77VND for Camera lenses,black
Tiffen 77mm Variable Neutral Density Filter 77VND for Camera lenses,black
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Features

  • Provides 2 to 8 stops of light control depending on lens focal distance
  • Thin profile black rotating ring: 9 millimeter. Black aluminum filter ring
  • Wider outer optic to help reduce vignetting at wide angles
  • Made with high quality optical glass using Tiffen's color core technology for sharpness
  • Made in the USA
  • 10 year manufactures warranty when purchased through an authorized re seller

Description

The Tiffen variable ND filter is a unique and flexible tool, affording you the convenience of using several neutral density filters in one Neutral density filters reduce the amount of light going through the lens into your camera. By reducing the light you are able to achieve the following: • Allows the use of slow shutter speeds, with high speed films or digital cameras, to record movement/image blur in subjects such as waterfalls, clouds or any fast moving subject • Gives you full control over your depth of field. You are able to decrease depth of field by using wider apertures, which helps separate subjects from their background (subject matter in focus while your background is blurred) • Allows you to shoot high speed film (above ISO 400) in bright outdoor situations by reducing effective ISO • Enables cine and video cameras (which have fixed shutter speeds) to film subjects such as snow, sand or other bright scenes which could cause overexposure Primarily used for controlling depth of field and exposure, the variable ND is easy to use, small, lightweight, and does not require additional accessories. Neutral density filters reduce the amount of light going through the lens into your camera. By reducing the light you are able to use of slow shutter speeds, with high speed films or digital cameras, to record movement/image blur in subjects such as waterfalls or any fast moving subject. It also gives you full control over your depth of field. The Tiffen variable ND filter operates on the same principle as a circular polarizer rotate until you reach your desired effect and shoot. It allows you to have continuous control over the amount of light coming through your lens in an approximate range of 2 (ND 0.6) to 8 (ND 2.4) stops while maintaining the integrity of your image. Box Contains 1 x Filter 1 x Instruction manual 1 x Filter pouch.


Product Dimensions 3.5 x 1 x 3.5 inches


Item Weight 4.2 ounces


ASIN B004Z55VP0


Item model number 77VND


Customer Reviews 4.4 out of 5 stars 927 ratings 4.4 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #3 in Camera Lens Neutral Density Filters


Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No


Date First Available May 1, 2011


Manufacturer Tiffen


Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Unless otherwise stated above, most products arrive within 2-3 business days. Larger items may take 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Features

  • Provides 2 to 8 stops of light control depending on lens focal distance
  • Thin profile black rotating ring: 9 millimeter. Black aluminum filter ring
  • Wider outer optic to help reduce vignetting at wide angles
  • Made with high quality optical glass using Tiffen's color core technology for sharpness
  • Made in the USA
  • 10 year manufactures warranty when purchased through an authorized re seller

Description

The Tiffen variable ND filter is a unique and flexible tool, affording you the convenience of using several neutral density filters in one Neutral density filters reduce the amount of light going through the lens into your camera. By reducing the light you are able to achieve the following: • Allows the use of slow shutter speeds, with high speed films or digital cameras, to record movement/image blur in subjects such as waterfalls, clouds or any fast moving subject • Gives you full control over your depth of field. You are able to decrease depth of field by using wider apertures, which helps separate subjects from their background (subject matter in focus while your background is blurred) • Allows you to shoot high speed film (above ISO 400) in bright outdoor situations by reducing effective ISO • Enables cine and video cameras (which have fixed shutter speeds) to film subjects such as snow, sand or other bright scenes which could cause overexposure Primarily used for controlling depth of field and exposure, the variable ND is easy to use, small, lightweight, and does not require additional accessories. Neutral density filters reduce the amount of light going through the lens into your camera. By reducing the light you are able to use of slow shutter speeds, with high speed films or digital cameras, to record movement/image blur in subjects such as waterfalls or any fast moving subject. It also gives you full control over your depth of field. The Tiffen variable ND filter operates on the same principle as a circular polarizer rotate until you reach your desired effect and shoot. It allows you to have continuous control over the amount of light coming through your lens in an approximate range of 2 (ND 0.6) to 8 (ND 2.4) stops while maintaining the integrity of your image. Box Contains 1 x Filter 1 x Instruction manual 1 x Filter pouch.


Product Dimensions 3.5 x 1 x 3.5 inches


Item Weight 4.2 ounces


ASIN B004Z55VP0


Item model number 77VND


Customer Reviews 4.4 out of 5 stars 927 ratings 4.4 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #3 in Camera Lens Neutral Density Filters


Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No


Date First Available May 1, 2011


Manufacturer Tiffen


Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Unless otherwise stated above, most products arrive within 2-3 business days. Larger items may take 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Features

  • Provides 2 to 8 stops of light control depending on lens focal distance
  • Thin profile black rotating ring: 9 millimeter. Black aluminum filter ring
  • Wider outer optic to help reduce vignetting at wide angles
  • Made with high quality optical glass using Tiffen's color core technology for sharpness
  • Made in the USA
  • 10 year manufactures warranty when purchased through an authorized re seller

Description

The Tiffen variable ND filter is a unique and flexible tool, affording you the convenience of using several neutral density filters in one Neutral density filters reduce the amount of light going through the lens into your camera. By reducing the light you are able to achieve the following: • Allows the use of slow shutter speeds, with high speed films or digital cameras, to record movement/image blur in subjects such as waterfalls, clouds or any fast moving subject • Gives you full control over your depth of field. You are able to decrease depth of field by using wider apertures, which helps separate subjects from their background (subject matter in focus while your background is blurred) • Allows you to shoot high speed film (above ISO 400) in bright outdoor situations by reducing effective ISO • Enables cine and video cameras (which have fixed shutter speeds) to film subjects such as snow, sand or other bright scenes which could cause overexposure Primarily used for controlling depth of field and exposure, the variable ND is easy to use, small, lightweight, and does not require additional accessories. Neutral density filters reduce the amount of light going through the lens into your camera. By reducing the light you are able to use of slow shutter speeds, with high speed films or digital cameras, to record movement/image blur in subjects such as waterfalls or any fast moving subject. It also gives you full control over your depth of field. The Tiffen variable ND filter operates on the same principle as a circular polarizer rotate until you reach your desired effect and shoot. It allows you to have continuous control over the amount of light coming through your lens in an approximate range of 2 (ND 0.6) to 8 (ND 2.4) stops while maintaining the integrity of your image. Box Contains 1 x Filter 1 x Instruction manual 1 x Filter pouch.


Product Dimensions 3.5 x 1 x 3.5 inches


Item Weight 4.2 ounces


ASIN B004Z55VP0


Item model number 77VND


Customer Reviews 4.4 out of 5 stars 927 ratings 4.4 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #3 in Camera Lens Neutral Density Filters


Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No


Date First Available May 1, 2011


Manufacturer Tiffen


abunda_amazon_reviews I debated for a while before I finally purchased this Variable ND filter. I knew it was important, but was always able to get by without using one for the most part unless I was shooting in broad daylight with no cloud coverage. After making this purchase, I don't know how I've gone so long without this. There are a few things to know when purchasing an ND filter. First, you want the Tiffen Variable ND. There are a few cheaper (as in $15ish), but they are extremely poorly made and will give a dark purple cast over the footage when the ND is turned up. Also, cheaper Variable ND's do not like zoom lenses, so prepare for nasty colors when zooming in. I have experienced none of those issues with the Tiffen. There's another, much more expensive Variable ND by Hoya, which in my opinion is not worth the money at all. Dave Dougdale did a very comprehensive review you should definitely check out comparing multiple ND's, and he preferred the look of the Tiffen over the Hoya which is twice as expensive. This is just personal preference, but when buying and ND, or any filter for that matter, buy the 82mm thread unless you absolutely don't want to for some odd reason. The reason for this is that they have multiple step down rigs that will allow you to change the filter thread. For example, I purchased the 82mm thread, and purchased a 82-77mm Step Down, 82-67mm Step Down, and 82-58mm Step Down ring. Now, instead of buying a new ND filter for all of my lenses and spending hundreds of extra dollars, I can buy a three dollar adapter. Yes, you'll have a much bigger filter on the end of your camera and it will look awkward, but you'll also have hundreds more in your pocket so it's all good. On a more technical term, I was able to keep 1/50 shutter at 24fps and f/4.0 with my A7s on a remotely sunny day with the ND set pretty high. I had to go up to a f/6.3 once, but without the NDI had to shoot at an f/22 and I was still +2 stops over exposed, so that just goes to show you how much range this ND gives you. If you ever plan on shooting out doors and keeping your shutter angle at 180 degrees without setting you aperture absurdly high, you need this. There's no other way to put it.;;Reviewed in the United States on December 26, 2015;;5.0 out of 5 stars;;Absolutely essential piece of gear.;;Daniel + Jennifer Waghorne;;;I have a Nikon D7200, and am leaving for Iceland in a few days, and after watching many videos I thought a neutral density filter might be a nice thing to have for taking photos of waterfalls and ocean. It seemed the variable density filter would be a nice compromise as I am not a professional, I would probably only use it a few times a year, and didn't want to invest a lot of money in a filter system. I had high regard for the Tiffen name, and after reading many of the reviews, I thought I would take a chance on the Tiffen 82mm VND filter. Since I never used one before I took my camera and tripod out at lunch yesterday and took some pictures of a nearby lake to practice (not a pretty setting, but I just wanted to get used to the filter). I set the shutter speed to 5 seconds, and took one picture at each of the setting marks. At the max end, I saw the problems that other reviews had noted, but figured I would just not use the max setting. I went back to my office and loaded the pictures onto my computer to look at them. The first four photos are unusable due to dark areas at various spots in the photos. Then I realized that there were marks in each photo. (If you look along the tree line you can see several marks, especially on the tree furthest to the right.) I first checked my wide angle lens but that was fine. Then I held the Tiffen up to a light and realized the scuff marks were on the lens and could not be cleaned off. It then dawned on m that I was sold a used lens as new. Since I am leaving for my trip in two days, I don't have time to order another, and frankly don't trust that I would get a new lens anyway. So it is being returned. What a disappointment. I will stop at a local camera shop today at lunch and see what kind of filters they have in stock. (in packing the filter back in the Tiffen box last night, I noticed a piece of paper that stated that Tiffen owed me a filter pouch and to go to their website, register the lens and they would send me a pouch. This further reinforced my opinion that I was sold a used lens as new.;;Reviewed in the United States on December 6, 2018;;1.0 out of 5 stars;;Very disappointed with this filter, and I was sold a used filter as new!!;;Sandy Knight;;;Versatile but ended up returning to try out some square filters instead. Pros: You can focus with it set to a lower stop setting, and then crank it up. If you were using fixed stop filters you can't do this, you'd have to take OFF the filters because it's hard for the camera to focus with too much filtering on. Cons: Vignetting/X-ing at too high stop levels. Difficult to use in combination with a dedicated circular polarizing (since this uses two polarized lenses in opposition to create the variability). Tips: Use back button focusing! Set the filter to minimum, then focus the scene (you can configure your camera to use a separate button than the shutter to focus). Then set the filter to desired stop, now set the exposure. My camera seemed to do just fine with automatic exposure metering with a lot of filtering on (just not automatic focusing). Now take your shot! (from a tripod with a remote shutter release, or with a timer delay of course).;;Reviewed in the United States on May 29, 2016;;4.0 out of 5 stars;;Versatile and handy but with limitations.;;John

Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Orders placed now will arrive in 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Top Amazon Reviews


5.0 out of 5 stars
By Daniel + Jennifer Waghorne - Reviewed in the United States on December 26, 2015
Absolutely essential piece of gear.
I debated for a while before I finally purchased this Variable ND filter. I knew it was important, but was always able to get by without using one for the most part unless I was shooting in broad daylight with no cloud coverage. After making this purchase, I don't know how I've gone so long without this. There are a few things to know when purchasing an ND filter. First, you want the Tiffen Variable ND. There are a few cheaper (as in $15ish), but they are extremely poorly made and will give a dark purple cast over the footage when the ND is turned up. Also, cheaper Variable ND's do not like zoom lenses, so prepare for nasty colors when zooming in. I have experienced none of those issues with the Tiffen. There's another, much more expensive Variable ND by Hoya, which in my opinion is not worth the money at all. Dave Dougdale did a very comprehensive review you should definitely check out comparing multiple ND's, and he preferred the look of the Tiffen over the Hoya which is twice as expensive. This is just personal preference, but when buying and ND, or any filter for that matter, buy the 82mm thread unless you absolutely don't want to for some odd reason. The reason for this is that they have multiple step down rigs that will allow you to change the filter thread. For example, I purchased the 82mm thread, and purchased a 82-77mm Step Down, 82-67mm Step Down, and 82-58mm Step Down ring. Now, instead of buying a new ND filter for all of my lenses and spending hundreds of extra dollars, I can buy a three dollar adapter. Yes, you'll have a much bigger filter on the end of your camera and it will look awkward, but you'll also have hundreds more in your pocket so it's all good. On a more technical term, I was able to keep 1/50 shutter at 24fps and f/4.0 with my A7s on a remotely sunny day with the ND set pretty high. I had to go up to a f/6.3 once, but without the NDI had to shoot at an f/22 and I was still +2 stops over exposed, so that just goes to show you how much range this ND gives you. If you ever plan on shooting out doors and keeping your shutter angle at 180 degrees without setting you aperture absurdly high, you need this. There's no other way to put it.

1.0 out of 5 stars
By Sandy Knight - Reviewed in the United States on December 6, 2018
Very disappointed with this filter, and I was sold a used filter as new!!
I have a Nikon D7200, and am leaving for Iceland in a few days, and after watching many videos I thought a neutral density filter might be a nice thing to have for taking photos of waterfalls and ocean. It seemed the variable density filter would be a nice compromise as I am not a professional, I would probably only use it a few times a year, and didn't want to invest a lot of money in a filter system. I had high regard for the Tiffen name, and after reading many of the reviews, I thought I would take a chance on the Tiffen 82mm VND filter. Since I never used one before I took my camera and tripod out at lunch yesterday and took some pictures of a nearby lake to practice (not a pretty setting, but I just wanted to get used to the filter). I set the shutter speed to 5 seconds, and took one picture at each of the setting marks. At the max end, I saw the problems that other reviews had noted, but figured I would just not use the max setting. I went back to my office and loaded the pictures onto my computer to look at them. The first four photos are unusable due to dark areas at various spots in the photos. Then I realized that there were marks in each photo. (If you look along the tree line you can see several marks, especially on the tree furthest to the right.) I first checked my wide angle lens but that was fine. Then I held the Tiffen up to a light and realized the scuff marks were on the lens and could not be cleaned off. It then dawned on m that I was sold a used lens as new. Since I am leaving for my trip in two days, I don't have time to order another, and frankly don't trust that I would get a new lens anyway. So it is being returned. What a disappointment. I will stop at a local camera shop today at lunch and see what kind of filters they have in stock. (in packing the filter back in the Tiffen box last night, I noticed a piece of paper that stated that Tiffen owed me a filter pouch and to go to their website, register the lens and they would send me a pouch. This further reinforced my opinion that I was sold a used lens as new.

4.0 out of 5 stars
By John - Reviewed in the United States on May 29, 2016
Versatile and handy but with limitations.
Versatile but ended up returning to try out some square filters instead. Pros: You can focus with it set to a lower stop setting, and then crank it up. If you were using fixed stop filters you can't do this, you'd have to take OFF the filters because it's hard for the camera to focus with too much filtering on. Cons: Vignetting/X-ing at too high stop levels. Difficult to use in combination with a dedicated circular polarizing (since this uses two polarized lenses in opposition to create the variability). Tips: Use back button focusing! Set the filter to minimum, then focus the scene (you can configure your camera to use a separate button than the shutter to focus). Then set the filter to desired stop, now set the exposure. My camera seemed to do just fine with automatic exposure metering with a lot of filtering on (just not automatic focusing). Now take your shot! (from a tripod with a remote shutter release, or with a timer delay of course).

Recent Reviews


5.0 out of 5 stars
By Daniel + Jennifer Waghorne - Reviewed in the United States on December 26, 2015
Absolutely essential piece of gear.
I debated for a while before I finally purchased this Variable ND filter. I knew it was important, but was always able to get by without using one for the most part unless I was shooting in broad daylight with no cloud coverage. After making this purchase, I don't know how I've gone so long without this. There are a few things to know when purchasing an ND filter. First, you want the Tiffen Variable ND. There are a few cheaper (as in $15ish), but they are extremely poorly made and will give a dark purple cast over the footage when the ND is turned up. Also, cheaper Variable ND's do not like zoom lenses, so prepare for nasty colors when zooming in. I have experienced none of those issues with the Tiffen. There's another, much more expensive Variable ND by Hoya, which in my opinion is not worth the money at all. Dave Dougdale did a very comprehensive review you should definitely check out comparing multiple ND's, and he preferred the look of the Tiffen over the Hoya which is twice as expensive. This is just personal preference, but when buying and ND, or any filter for that matter, buy the 82mm thread unless you absolutely don't want to for some odd reason. The reason for this is that they have multiple step down rigs that will allow you to change the filter thread. For example, I purchased the 82mm thread, and purchased a 82-77mm Step Down, 82-67mm Step Down, and 82-58mm Step Down ring. Now, instead of buying a new ND filter for all of my lenses and spending hundreds of extra dollars, I can buy a three dollar adapter. Yes, you'll have a much bigger filter on the end of your camera and it will look awkward, but you'll also have hundreds more in your pocket so it's all good. On a more technical term, I was able to keep 1/50 shutter at 24fps and f/4.0 with my A7s on a remotely sunny day with the ND set pretty high. I had to go up to a f/6.3 once, but without the NDI had to shoot at an f/22 and I was still +2 stops over exposed, so that just goes to show you how much range this ND gives you. If you ever plan on shooting out doors and keeping your shutter angle at 180 degrees without setting you aperture absurdly high, you need this. There's no other way to put it.

1.0 out of 5 stars
By Sandy Knight - Reviewed in the United States on December 6, 2018
Very disappointed with this filter, and I was sold a used filter as new!!
I have a Nikon D7200, and am leaving for Iceland in a few days, and after watching many videos I thought a neutral density filter might be a nice thing to have for taking photos of waterfalls and ocean. It seemed the variable density filter would be a nice compromise as I am not a professional, I would probably only use it a few times a year, and didn't want to invest a lot of money in a filter system. I had high regard for the Tiffen name, and after reading many of the reviews, I thought I would take a chance on the Tiffen 82mm VND filter. Since I never used one before I took my camera and tripod out at lunch yesterday and took some pictures of a nearby lake to practice (not a pretty setting, but I just wanted to get used to the filter). I set the shutter speed to 5 seconds, and took one picture at each of the setting marks. At the max end, I saw the problems that other reviews had noted, but figured I would just not use the max setting. I went back to my office and loaded the pictures onto my computer to look at them. The first four photos are unusable due to dark areas at various spots in the photos. Then I realized that there were marks in each photo. (If you look along the tree line you can see several marks, especially on the tree furthest to the right.) I first checked my wide angle lens but that was fine. Then I held the Tiffen up to a light and realized the scuff marks were on the lens and could not be cleaned off. It then dawned on m that I was sold a used lens as new. Since I am leaving for my trip in two days, I don't have time to order another, and frankly don't trust that I would get a new lens anyway. So it is being returned. What a disappointment. I will stop at a local camera shop today at lunch and see what kind of filters they have in stock. (in packing the filter back in the Tiffen box last night, I noticed a piece of paper that stated that Tiffen owed me a filter pouch and to go to their website, register the lens and they would send me a pouch. This further reinforced my opinion that I was sold a used lens as new.

4.0 out of 5 stars
By John - Reviewed in the United States on May 29, 2016
Versatile and handy but with limitations.
Versatile but ended up returning to try out some square filters instead. Pros: You can focus with it set to a lower stop setting, and then crank it up. If you were using fixed stop filters you can't do this, you'd have to take OFF the filters because it's hard for the camera to focus with too much filtering on. Cons: Vignetting/X-ing at too high stop levels. Difficult to use in combination with a dedicated circular polarizing (since this uses two polarized lenses in opposition to create the variability). Tips: Use back button focusing! Set the filter to minimum, then focus the scene (you can configure your camera to use a separate button than the shutter to focus). Then set the filter to desired stop, now set the exposure. My camera seemed to do just fine with automatic exposure metering with a lot of filtering on (just not automatic focusing). Now take your shot! (from a tripod with a remote shutter release, or with a timer delay of course).