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Reliance Controls 31410CRK Pro/Tran 10-Circuit 30 Amp Generator Transfer Switch Kit,Gray
Reliance Controls 31410CRK Pro/Tran 10-Circuit 30 Amp Generator Transfer Switch Kit,Gray

Reliance Controls 31410CRK Pro/Tran 10-Circuit 30 Amp Generator Transfer Switch Kit,Gray

Condition: New
Reliance Controls 31410CRK Pro/Tran 10-Circuit 30 Amp Generator Transfer Switch Kit,Gray
Reliance Controls 31410CRK Pro/Tran 10-Circuit 30 Amp Generator Transfer Switch Kit,Gray

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Style: Transfer Switch Kit


Features

  • Convenient transfer switch kit, ideal for your circuitry and multi-wiring needs, is also made for reliably-fast installation in both residential and commercial applications
  • Designed specifically for generators up to 7,500 maximum running watts
  • 18-inch flexible conduit whip attaches easily to the load center
  • Maximum single-pole circuits: 10 / Maximum double-pole circuits: 5
  • Features a rugged, powder-coated steel cabinet. six combination knockouts and more

Product Dimensions: 7 x 4.5 x 13.75 inches


Item Weight: 18 pounds


Manufacturer: Reliance Controls


Item model number: 31410CRK


Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: No


Style: Transfer Switch Kit


Features

  • Convenient transfer switch kit, ideal for your circuitry and multi-wiring needs, is also made for reliably-fast installation in both residential and commercial applications
  • Designed specifically for generators up to 7,500 maximum running watts
  • 18-inch flexible conduit whip attaches easily to the load center
  • Maximum single-pole circuits: 10 / Maximum double-pole circuits: 5
  • Features a rugged, powder-coated steel cabinet. six combination knockouts and more

Product Dimensions: 7 x 4.5 x 13.75 inches


Item Weight: 18 pounds


Manufacturer: Reliance Controls


Item model number: 31410CRK


Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: No


Top Amazon Reviews


2.0 out of 5 stars | K
Style: Transfer Switch Kit
More updated, SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVED, 310CRK released by Reliance

This model has been updated and replaced by Reliance 310CRK. This model works great if you only run smaller devices. The largest you can switch over is a double-pole 20Amp, which is not clearly defined in the description. The NEWER MODEL (310CRK) has a cover, actual breakers (not just push button resets), REPLACEABLE common Square D breakers and, per the instructions from the vendor, you can swap out the main double pole 20Amp breaker with a double 30Amp breaker (for things like water heaters). The newer model also has a breaker cover, this one is completely exposed, which the electrician was not fond of.

~ Reviewed in the United States on March 14, 2018

5.0 out of 5 stars | Daniel
Style: Transfer Switch Kit
Easy install, easier to use.

I selected the Reliance Controls 31410CRK because of its positive reviews, overall value, and ease of installation. The kit includes hardware to wire into the service panel, but some other pieces of hardware are required. (Like wire and mounting hardware) The kit included an Installation DVD that I never watched. The written instructions and the tutorial on Reliance Controls' website were more than sufficient. The total time working inside the panel was about 30 minutes. The total project time, including mounting hardware and pulling wire was under 3 hours. A suggestion I have for anyone looking at any transfer switch is planning. I mapped all of the outlets, light fixtures, appliances, etc. to each circuit. Then I used meters and product labels to determine wattage requirements of various products. Armed with that data, I was able to plan the circuit layout to balance the load on the generator and pair amperages between breakers and switches. It also helped when deciding which circuits were absolutely necessary, nice to have, and not needed. Another suggestion is to replace standard light bulbs with compact florescent bulbs. My house has 28 light bulbs. At 60W each, the total is 1,680 watts, but the 13 watt CFL total is only 364 watts. Granted, all the lights in the house aren't on at the same time, but it will reduce the load on the generator and your electric bill in the long run. The power inlet box is a little cramped when using knockouts in the back. I still opted for using the rear knockout for a flush appearance outside. The 20 amp cord end would have been handy, but I have a 30 amp generator and won't be using it. Pictures on the web always seem to show the transfer switch to the left of the panel. The cable can be rotated and the switch mounted to the right of the panel, as I did. The wires were long enough to reach from the bottom of the panel to the top, so a lot of wire needed to be trimmed off. I trimmed as I worked, so the cables are all just the right length now. Since this is a permanent installation, I would have liked to see solid core wire rather than stranded. (Only for clean panel installation and ease of insertion in breakers.) The MC connectors between the service panel and the transfer switch do have anti-short bushings. Depending on your state and inspector, they may or may not be required. The kit includes two handle ties if any circuits require 240v. There are two screws on each tie that make them easily removable. Since I didn't have any circuits requiring 240v, I removed both ties to use the full 10 circuits. Each of the wires from the transfer switch is marked with letters for the circuit. The H and the I look very similar, so pay attention to cable orientation when you look at the letters. I paired all the wires and taped them together before starting to avoid hunting in the dark. There are just enough wire nuts to perform the installation in the panel and in the switch, so don't drop any into the sump area. When power is out, cut-over is simple. Start the generator, plug the generator into the power inlet, and throw the circuit switches. I like to throw the switches one at a time. The watt meter will spike when startup current is drawn. When the meter goes back down, I'll throw the next switch. Since Reliance uses break-before-make switches, you can safely perform generator testing while the house is still on utility power. There is no risk of utility power passing to the generator or generator power feeding into utility power, if wired properly. Individual circuits can be flipped to make sure things are working before a power outage occurs. Overall, I think the transfer switch is well constructed and the instructions are thought out and complete. My previous electrical experience was limited to replacing outlets and installing ceiling fans, which helped, but the installation of this was very straightforward. I will definitely be installing one of these transfer switches in any house I own in the future.

~ Reviewed in the United States on August 6, 2012

5.0 out of 5 stars | teenie
Style: Transfer Switch Kit
Good to have this instead of extension cords

I purchased a generator from another site back in the summer of 2016. I figured at least that was a start, if the power went out I could run a cord thru my window and keep the refrigerator running. That all changed when my dad was what I was up to. He went on line to search for the best thing we could get for my needs. He told me get this one and I did in August of 2016. When this came in he was at my house that Saturday to install this. All was great for installation until our next door neighbor house burned down. My dad did this while working his full time job and taking care of two houses, so this was going to take us a little more time, and I was in no hurry. He did all the work and brought his wire over to run from this box to the outside of the house, which saved me money also. He had all of this wired up except the short wire connected to this transfer box, and then he passed away. I'm about as handy as an elephant in a china cabinet, so I had to call in a professional electrician to finish that part. They came in and had to inspect everything, then said they would like to hire him, and finished the job for me. I have my whole house hooked up, except my dryer, and was not disappointed as I didn't want that. I understand that not everything will be used at the time when we need. I want to be able to have my refrigerator and furnace to run. We can also have some lights on and tv or radio. We also have a sump pump to run and that was my main concern of having a generator. This is like having insurance, glad to have it when it's time to use it.

~ Reviewed in the United States on April 18, 2020