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X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium

X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium

X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
X-Rite i1Display Pro (EODIS3),i1Display Pro Display Calibration,Medium
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Features

  • PROFESSIONAL CALIBER: i1Display Pro combines ambient light measurement, monitor profiling & projector profiling into a sleek, compact and fully integrated device at 5 times faster measurements than previous devices, offering unrivalled color precision
  • DUAL MODE: Two user modes (Basic & Advanced) provide serious Color Perfectionists with the perfect combination of unrivaled color precision, speed, options & controls to fit any workflow. Includes quality assurance functions & display uniformity testing.
  • ULTIMATE ACCURACY: The X-Rite i1Display Pro is the ultimate choice for discerning photographers, filmmakers, designers and imaging professionals looking for the highest level of on-screen color accuracy for displays, laptops, mobile devices and projectors
  • COLOR MANAGEMENT EXPERTISE: X-Rite is the leader in color management solutions. Our color matching products can help you get you the right color every time, accurately & consistently, whether you're an enthusiast or professional photographer or filmmaker; Intelligent Iterative Profiling, an adaptive technology, produces optimized results for maximum color accuracy on each unique display every time you profile.
  • A NOTE ABOUT 3RD PARTY SOFTWARE: Please check with your 3rd party software developer to verify if this device is supported. X-Rite can only guarantee compatibility with the included X-Rite i1Profiler software.

Description

Don’t waste precious time perfecting images or video with a display that does not accurately represent your digital files. A calibrated and profiled display is a critical element in an efficient digital workflow. The X-Rite i1Display Pro is the ultimate choice for discerning photographers, filmmakers, designers and imaging professionals looking for the highest level of on-screen color accuracy for displays, laptops, mobile devices and projectors. Two user modes (Basic and Advanced) provide serious Color Perfectionists with the perfect combination of unrivaled color precision, speed, options and controls to fit any workflow. Includes quality assurance functions and display uniformity testing.


Product Dimensions 2 x 2 x 3 inches


Item Weight 8.8 ounces


ASIN B0055MBQOW


Item model number EODIS3


Batteries 1 Lithium ion batteries required.


Customer Reviews 4.3 out of 5 stars 1,510 ratings 4.3 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #3 in Photographic Light Meter Color Calibration Charts


Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No


Date First Available June 14, 2011


Manufacturer X-Rite


Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Unless otherwise stated above, most products arrive within 2-3 business days. Larger items may take 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Features

  • PROFESSIONAL CALIBER: i1Display Pro combines ambient light measurement, monitor profiling & projector profiling into a sleek, compact and fully integrated device at 5 times faster measurements than previous devices, offering unrivalled color precision
  • DUAL MODE: Two user modes (Basic & Advanced) provide serious Color Perfectionists with the perfect combination of unrivaled color precision, speed, options & controls to fit any workflow. Includes quality assurance functions & display uniformity testing.
  • ULTIMATE ACCURACY: The X-Rite i1Display Pro is the ultimate choice for discerning photographers, filmmakers, designers and imaging professionals looking for the highest level of on-screen color accuracy for displays, laptops, mobile devices and projectors
  • COLOR MANAGEMENT EXPERTISE: X-Rite is the leader in color management solutions. Our color matching products can help you get you the right color every time, accurately & consistently, whether you're an enthusiast or professional photographer or filmmaker; Intelligent Iterative Profiling, an adaptive technology, produces optimized results for maximum color accuracy on each unique display every time you profile.
  • A NOTE ABOUT 3RD PARTY SOFTWARE: Please check with your 3rd party software developer to verify if this device is supported. X-Rite can only guarantee compatibility with the included X-Rite i1Profiler software.

Description

Don’t waste precious time perfecting images or video with a display that does not accurately represent your digital files. A calibrated and profiled display is a critical element in an efficient digital workflow. The X-Rite i1Display Pro is the ultimate choice for discerning photographers, filmmakers, designers and imaging professionals looking for the highest level of on-screen color accuracy for displays, laptops, mobile devices and projectors. Two user modes (Basic and Advanced) provide serious Color Perfectionists with the perfect combination of unrivaled color precision, speed, options and controls to fit any workflow. Includes quality assurance functions and display uniformity testing.


Product Dimensions 2 x 2 x 3 inches


Item Weight 8.8 ounces


ASIN B0055MBQOW


Item model number EODIS3


Batteries 1 Lithium ion batteries required.


Customer Reviews 4.3 out of 5 stars 1,510 ratings 4.3 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #3 in Photographic Light Meter Color Calibration Charts


Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No


Date First Available June 14, 2011


Manufacturer X-Rite


Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Unless otherwise stated above, most products arrive within 2-3 business days. Larger items may take 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Features

  • PROFESSIONAL CALIBER: i1Display Pro combines ambient light measurement, monitor profiling & projector profiling into a sleek, compact and fully integrated device at 5 times faster measurements than previous devices, offering unrivalled color precision
  • DUAL MODE: Two user modes (Basic & Advanced) provide serious Color Perfectionists with the perfect combination of unrivaled color precision, speed, options & controls to fit any workflow. Includes quality assurance functions & display uniformity testing.
  • ULTIMATE ACCURACY: The X-Rite i1Display Pro is the ultimate choice for discerning photographers, filmmakers, designers and imaging professionals looking for the highest level of on-screen color accuracy for displays, laptops, mobile devices and projectors
  • COLOR MANAGEMENT EXPERTISE: X-Rite is the leader in color management solutions. Our color matching products can help you get you the right color every time, accurately & consistently, whether you're an enthusiast or professional photographer or filmmaker; Intelligent Iterative Profiling, an adaptive technology, produces optimized results for maximum color accuracy on each unique display every time you profile.
  • A NOTE ABOUT 3RD PARTY SOFTWARE: Please check with your 3rd party software developer to verify if this device is supported. X-Rite can only guarantee compatibility with the included X-Rite i1Profiler software.

Description

Don’t waste precious time perfecting images or video with a display that does not accurately represent your digital files. A calibrated and profiled display is a critical element in an efficient digital workflow. The X-Rite i1Display Pro is the ultimate choice for discerning photographers, filmmakers, designers and imaging professionals looking for the highest level of on-screen color accuracy for displays, laptops, mobile devices and projectors. Two user modes (Basic and Advanced) provide serious Color Perfectionists with the perfect combination of unrivaled color precision, speed, options and controls to fit any workflow. Includes quality assurance functions and display uniformity testing.


Product Dimensions 2 x 2 x 3 inches


Item Weight 8.8 ounces


ASIN B0055MBQOW


Item model number EODIS3


Batteries 1 Lithium ion batteries required.


Customer Reviews 4.3 out of 5 stars 1,510 ratings 4.3 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #3 in Photographic Light Meter Color Calibration Charts


Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No


Date First Available June 14, 2011


Manufacturer X-Rite


abunda_amazon_reviews Purchased this Colorimeter (not to be confused with a Spectrometer or Spectrophotometer, which are more advanced beasts of a similar kind) to color-match the screens of my various devices when editing my raw photos and videos. This hardware is considered to be the best, and for the premium that's expected. However, it misses the mark by far, because it's handicapped by software. For the past few days, I've literally calibrated my monitors more than 30 times. The software allows you to customize the number of test swatches being used to calibrate the monitor, to increase the color accuracy, and I used the largest set (462 colors) for all but the first three calibration attempts. Let me say first, in some cases there's a problem with installing X-Rite's i1Profiler calibration software on Windows 10 machines. Some configurations will result in a missing DLL file that prevents the program from loading at all. -- After many hours of troubleshooting I was able to finally get the missing DLL into the system. To do so, I had to install the latest version of their i1Profiler software, then install the 3+ year old version of their X-Rite Device Services software (v2.4.0, released: 10/7/2015). I do not recommend doing that. Although it worked, there are potential problems with using a system software that was created before the operating system was refined / secured. If you intend on calibrating your monitors and uninstalling it after, then it might be okay to use that method to get it to work. Keep in mind that the older version of the system software will be missing features and refinement / optimizations of the newer version, so your milage may vary. -- Once the program was able to load, it worked very well in Windows. I was able to get the three monitor gaming setup of the Windows machine to display with consistent results across all of them. There was a very slight, almost imperceivable difference, that my friend and I noticed while making an image wide enough that it covered all three 27" inch screens ... but we chalked that up to the fact that the monitors aren't the same age. Two were purchased at the same time, but two years after the first one, and all three are at least 4 years old. All things considered, the results were pretty impressive. Under MacOS it's a different story. Specifically the TouchBar MacBook Pro, which I wasn't able to get anywhere near the three PC monitors. I researched it extensively, intimately learning much more about monitor calibration. Going further and further down the rabbit hole as my calibration methods became more complex. I followed X-Rite's recommended "Linear Profile" MacOS approach, because unfortunately it's a well-documented problem (so they are very much aware of it, yet still haven't fixed the issue hence "unfortunately"). I tried calibrating for different monitor technologies, no dice. The picture ended up being significantly more orange than the Windows displays. It's telling, when the company that makes the product has a page titled "Technology Type For Apple Displays" which says, "The next update to i1Profiler will add a new Technology Type for 2016 and later MacBook Pros so current i1Display Pro users should stay with the 'White LED' Technology Type." Ummm, it's now 2019. 3 years have passed and they still haven't added the correct display technology, and still ask users to use a generic monitor technology. That is unacceptable for a piece of hardware at this price-level. It speaks volumes for their customer support, and the customer complaints in their Amazon product reviews reflect exactly that. Had I noticed those reviews before purchasing it, I might have given it a second thought. However, all is not lost. There is a way to get excellent results on any display, but not using i1Profiler. Instead, use DisplayCAL. It's a very-well designed piece of Open Source software, so it's the result of many community contributions far beyond what the X-Rite team developed. Due to the wide array of user configurations, the software makes few assumptions. Whereas X-Rite knows what their hardware does and so they program with assumptions that everything is working well, DisplayCAL doesn't know and instead tests everything. It calibrates / tests the calibrator extensively before even calibrating the monitor. You can choose the level of complexity of calibrator testing, as well as the level of complexity of monitor testing. i1Profiler maxed out at 462 color test swatches for my purposes, but with DisplayCAL I was running 4,954 color tests per calibration, and testing the calibrator for an hour before each monitor calibration. Admittedly that was beyond excessive for my needs, but I wanted to be sure / was curious, and so it took 2 to 3 hours for each calibration that I did. Trying multiple configurations, my laptop literally calibrated for 3 days straight, while I slept and did other things. Through that process I have learned that DisplayCAL's 12 minute default calibration produces very similar results as their 4,954 color calibration. Yes, there is a discernible difference if you apply the different color profiles to the monitor and look for the changes, but for most people's needs a 12 minute calibration is more than enough, and is noticeably different from the default macOS and Windows display profile calibrations. So if you can do without i1Profiler, it's possible to get excellent results across any monitor. If you need i1Profiler and are using Windows, an iMac, a Mac with an external display, or a MacBook with an older than 2016 display technology ... you will probably get great results, because all of those things are supported. In that case, I only recommend that you do not use the ambient light measurement when creating your calibration profiles. That will skew the results significantly, and should only be used if you are in an environment where the lighting never changes (and thus the lighting consistently skews the color of the monitor). If you are in an environment where the lighting varies throughout your day, disable the ambient light measurement while calibrating. Then, enable the ambient light adjustments "after" creating your color profile. It'll create a profile that doesn't factor in the color of the current light, but still allow you to dynamically adjust the brightness of the display based on the brightness of your environment; which is what most would need / want. However, if you are like me, expecting to color match your 2016 or later MBP with your iOS Devices, so that your mobile (iPad/iPhone) color workflow also matches your desktop ... that currently is impossible. X-Rite's calibration app on iOS is called ColorTrue, and it absolutely will not match a 2016+ MBP display's results. It's possible that Datacolor's Spyder Colorimeters might work better, but I haven't tested them. The X-Rite spectrophotometers (not colorimeters) would definitely work better. But X-Rite's cheapest spectrophotometers, the i1Studio Photo (EOSTUDIO, $489 on Amazon), the older ColorMunki Photo (CMUNPH, $499 on Amazon), or the more precise i1Basic Pro 2 (EO2BAS, $1,589 on Amazon) are a decent increase on investment in color accuracy. Ultimately, if you have a 2016 or later MacBook and want to use the iOS software, this hardware is a waste of time until X-Rite updates their monitor technology types. In all other cases, I can actually recommend this device. -- For me, personally this device is unusable, my MBP is my primary work machine and is the sole reason I purchased this colorimeter. So, I'll be going elsewhere. Probably the i1Studio Photo or i1Pro 2 if I can justify the cost.;;Reviewed in the United States on January 30, 2019;;3.0 out of 5 stars;;Poor MacBook Pro Support, Works Well With Other Macs and Windows;;Prasand J.;;;The X-Rite i1Display Pro is a MUST HAVE for all photographers who ever plan to sell their photographs. Having a calibrated screen is an absolute must and the i1 will do it perfectly! With its ambient light detection, you don't have to worry about changing lighting conditions in your house affecting how you edit your photos. With active ambient light detection the device makes on the fly changes to your profile as lighting changes in the room. A huge bonus over the cheaper alternatives. The device will remind you at predetermined times that your calibration is due for a re-calibration (recommended once a week). Its a solid built device and easy to use. You can even use it to color correct your IPAD as long as you use the supplied app to view photos, you can guarantee the photos on your Ipad are exactly what the customer will see when you provide them with your finished work!;;Reviewed in the United States on January 16, 2018;;5.0 out of 5 stars;;Must have for ALL Professional Photographers.;;Steven Hendricks Photography;;;I have worked professionally with color for over 2 decades. I have profiled numerous monitors and printers using colorimeters and spectrophotometers with different software applications. The X-Rite i1 Display Pro colorimeter works superbly. Fast reads, simple attachment to the monitor screen. The bundled software is easy to use. The standard number of patches or the expanded number of patches in advanced mode each yield very accurate profiles. Standard of advanced mode.....I see no difference. I use a dual monitor setup in WIndows 10. The profile created for each monitor produces identical viewing results with the same image. Follow the procedures in the software, and, make the necessary monitor hardware adjustments and the result is an accurately calibrated monitor suitable for the most demanding professional requirements.;;Reviewed in the United States on August 21, 2019;;5.0 out of 5 stars;;Excellent Hardware. Accurate easy to use software.;;LV Artist;;;My 2010 iMac calibrated with the Spyder4 Pro really well. My new 2018 iMac with the 5K Retina is miserable with the Spyder4. Datacolor seems to never update their software, but opts to sell you new software so no matter what device you get from Datacolor it will fairly rapidly become obsolete. Based on internet info I gambled on the i1 Display Pro. It's a lot better, but I wouldn't say that it's great. You must do research to determine your backlight type which definitely is different depending on the year your iMac was made. It won't hurt to do research on what settings to use for i1 Pro as well because there are some options that are not well explained. Anyway, for me I ended up using the built in Apple color calibration tool in System Preferences/Display/Color. That has produced the best color renderings so far, based on viewing images printed and viewed on other systems. I won't say that this is the best option either but so far it's the better option. If I were to do it over again I'd just get a fast 21.5" iMac and have the factory install a bunch of RAM (since it's almost impossible to do it yourself, unlike the 27" version which is a breeze), then use the computer as my secondary (menus) display and buy a good non-Retina display as my primary display. Test a lot with the tools that came with your computer until you can determine if it doesn't work for you, then explore other options. There's no reason to buy an expensive tool and have it sit unused. And never buy a Spyder if you have a Retina display.;;Reviewed in the United States on October 16, 2018;;3.0 out of 5 stars;;So so for an IMac Retina display - for photograpy use;;H. J. Seeley

Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Orders placed now will arrive in 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Top Amazon Reviews


3.0 out of 5 stars
By Prasand J. - Reviewed in the United States on January 30, 2019
Poor MacBook Pro Support, Works Well With Other Macs and Windows
Purchased this Colorimeter (not to be confused with a Spectrometer or Spectrophotometer, which are more advanced beasts of a similar kind) to color-match the screens of my various devices when editing my raw photos and videos. This hardware is considered to be the best, and for the premium that's expected. However, it misses the mark by far, because it's handicapped by software. For the past few days, I've literally calibrated my monitors more than 30 times. The software allows you to customize the number of test swatches being used to calibrate the monitor, to increase the color accuracy, and I used the largest set (462 colors) for all but the first three calibration attempts. Let me say first, in some cases there's a problem with installing X-Rite's i1Profiler calibration software on Windows 10 machines. Some configurations will result in a missing DLL file that prevents the program from loading at all. -- After many hours of troubleshooting I was able to finally get the missing DLL into the system. To do so, I had to install the latest version of their i1Profiler software, then install the 3+ year old version of their X-Rite Device Services software (v2.4.0, released: 10/7/2015). I do not recommend doing that. Although it worked, there are potential problems with using a system software that was created before the operating system was refined / secured. If you intend on calibrating your monitors and uninstalling it after, then it might be okay to use that method to get it to work. Keep in mind that the older version of the system software will be missing features and refinement / optimizations of the newer version, so your milage may vary. -- Once the program was able to load, it worked very well in Windows. I was able to get the three monitor gaming setup of the Windows machine to display with consistent results across all of them. There was a very slight, almost imperceivable difference, that my friend and I noticed while making an image wide enough that it covered all three 27" inch screens ... but we chalked that up to the fact that the monitors aren't the same age. Two were purchased at the same time, but two years after the first one, and all three are at least 4 years old. All things considered, the results were pretty impressive. Under MacOS it's a different story. Specifically the TouchBar MacBook Pro, which I wasn't able to get anywhere near the three PC monitors. I researched it extensively, intimately learning much more about monitor calibration. Going further and further down the rabbit hole as my calibration methods became more complex. I followed X-Rite's recommended "Linear Profile" MacOS approach, because unfortunately it's a well-documented problem (so they are very much aware of it, yet still haven't fixed the issue hence "unfortunately"). I tried calibrating for different monitor technologies, no dice. The picture ended up being significantly more orange than the Windows displays. It's telling, when the company that makes the product has a page titled "Technology Type For Apple Displays" which says, "The next update to i1Profiler will add a new Technology Type for 2016 and later MacBook Pros so current i1Display Pro users should stay with the 'White LED' Technology Type." Ummm, it's now 2019. 3 years have passed and they still haven't added the correct display technology, and still ask users to use a generic monitor technology. That is unacceptable for a piece of hardware at this price-level. It speaks volumes for their customer support, and the customer complaints in their Amazon product reviews reflect exactly that. Had I noticed those reviews before purchasing it, I might have given it a second thought. However, all is not lost. There is a way to get excellent results on any display, but not using i1Profiler. Instead, use DisplayCAL. It's a very-well designed piece of Open Source software, so it's the result of many community contributions far beyond what the X-Rite team developed. Due to the wide array of user configurations, the software makes few assumptions. Whereas X-Rite knows what their hardware does and so they program with assumptions that everything is working well, DisplayCAL doesn't know and instead tests everything. It calibrates / tests the calibrator extensively before even calibrating the monitor. You can choose the level of complexity of calibrator testing, as well as the level of complexity of monitor testing. i1Profiler maxed out at 462 color test swatches for my purposes, but with DisplayCAL I was running 4,954 color tests per calibration, and testing the calibrator for an hour before each monitor calibration. Admittedly that was beyond excessive for my needs, but I wanted to be sure / was curious, and so it took 2 to 3 hours for each calibration that I did. Trying multiple configurations, my laptop literally calibrated for 3 days straight, while I slept and did other things. Through that process I have learned that DisplayCAL's 12 minute default calibration produces very similar results as their 4,954 color calibration. Yes, there is a discernible difference if you apply the different color profiles to the monitor and look for the changes, but for most people's needs a 12 minute calibration is more than enough, and is noticeably different from the default macOS and Windows display profile calibrations. So if you can do without i1Profiler, it's possible to get excellent results across any monitor. If you need i1Profiler and are using Windows, an iMac, a Mac with an external display, or a MacBook with an older than 2016 display technology ... you will probably get great results, because all of those things are supported. In that case, I only recommend that you do not use the ambient light measurement when creating your calibration profiles. That will skew the results significantly, and should only be used if you are in an environment where the lighting never changes (and thus the lighting consistently skews the color of the monitor). If you are in an environment where the lighting varies throughout your day, disable the ambient light measurement while calibrating. Then, enable the ambient light adjustments "after" creating your color profile. It'll create a profile that doesn't factor in the color of the current light, but still allow you to dynamically adjust the brightness of the display based on the brightness of your environment; which is what most would need / want. However, if you are like me, expecting to color match your 2016 or later MBP with your iOS Devices, so that your mobile (iPad/iPhone) color workflow also matches your desktop ... that currently is impossible. X-Rite's calibration app on iOS is called ColorTrue, and it absolutely will not match a 2016+ MBP display's results. It's possible that Datacolor's Spyder Colorimeters might work better, but I haven't tested them. The X-Rite spectrophotometers (not colorimeters) would definitely work better. But X-Rite's cheapest spectrophotometers, the i1Studio Photo (EOSTUDIO, $489 on Amazon), the older ColorMunki Photo (CMUNPH, $499 on Amazon), or the more precise i1Basic Pro 2 (EO2BAS, $1,589 on Amazon) are a decent increase on investment in color accuracy. Ultimately, if you have a 2016 or later MacBook and want to use the iOS software, this hardware is a waste of time until X-Rite updates their monitor technology types. In all other cases, I can actually recommend this device. -- For me, personally this device is unusable, my MBP is my primary work machine and is the sole reason I purchased this colorimeter. So, I'll be going elsewhere. Probably the i1Studio Photo or i1Pro 2 if I can justify the cost.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Steven Hendricks Photography - Reviewed in the United States on January 16, 2018
Must have for ALL Professional Photographers.
The X-Rite i1Display Pro is a MUST HAVE for all photographers who ever plan to sell their photographs. Having a calibrated screen is an absolute must and the i1 will do it perfectly! With its ambient light detection, you don't have to worry about changing lighting conditions in your house affecting how you edit your photos. With active ambient light detection the device makes on the fly changes to your profile as lighting changes in the room. A huge bonus over the cheaper alternatives. The device will remind you at predetermined times that your calibration is due for a re-calibration (recommended once a week). Its a solid built device and easy to use. You can even use it to color correct your IPAD as long as you use the supplied app to view photos, you can guarantee the photos on your Ipad are exactly what the customer will see when you provide them with your finished work!

5.0 out of 5 stars
By LV Artist - Reviewed in the United States on August 21, 2019
Excellent Hardware. Accurate easy to use software.
I have worked professionally with color for over 2 decades. I have profiled numerous monitors and printers using colorimeters and spectrophotometers with different software applications. The X-Rite i1 Display Pro colorimeter works superbly. Fast reads, simple attachment to the monitor screen. The bundled software is easy to use. The standard number of patches or the expanded number of patches in advanced mode each yield very accurate profiles. Standard of advanced mode.....I see no difference. I use a dual monitor setup in WIndows 10. The profile created for each monitor produces identical viewing results with the same image. Follow the procedures in the software, and, make the necessary monitor hardware adjustments and the result is an accurately calibrated monitor suitable for the most demanding professional requirements.

3.0 out of 5 stars
By H. J. Seeley - Reviewed in the United States on October 16, 2018
So so for an IMac Retina display - for photograpy use
My 2010 iMac calibrated with the Spyder4 Pro really well. My new 2018 iMac with the 5K Retina is miserable with the Spyder4. Datacolor seems to never update their software, but opts to sell you new software so no matter what device you get from Datacolor it will fairly rapidly become obsolete. Based on internet info I gambled on the i1 Display Pro. It's a lot better, but I wouldn't say that it's great. You must do research to determine your backlight type which definitely is different depending on the year your iMac was made. It won't hurt to do research on what settings to use for i1 Pro as well because there are some options that are not well explained. Anyway, for me I ended up using the built in Apple color calibration tool in System Preferences/Display/Color. That has produced the best color renderings so far, based on viewing images printed and viewed on other systems. I won't say that this is the best option either but so far it's the better option. If I were to do it over again I'd just get a fast 21.5" iMac and have the factory install a bunch of RAM (since it's almost impossible to do it yourself, unlike the 27" version which is a breeze), then use the computer as my secondary (menus) display and buy a good non-Retina display as my primary display. Test a lot with the tools that came with your computer until you can determine if it doesn't work for you, then explore other options. There's no reason to buy an expensive tool and have it sit unused. And never buy a Spyder if you have a Retina display.

Top Reviews


3.0 out of 5 stars
By Prasand J. - Reviewed in the United States on January 30, 2019
Poor MacBook Pro Support, Works Well With Other Macs and Windows
Purchased this Colorimeter (not to be confused with a Spectrometer or Spectrophotometer, which are more advanced beasts of a similar kind) to color-match the screens of my various devices when editing my raw photos and videos. This hardware is considered to be the best, and for the premium that's expected. However, it misses the mark by far, because it's handicapped by software. For the past few days, I've literally calibrated my monitors more than 30 times. The software allows you to customize the number of test swatches being used to calibrate the monitor, to increase the color accuracy, and I used the largest set (462 colors) for all but the first three calibration attempts. Let me say first, in some cases there's a problem with installing X-Rite's i1Profiler calibration software on Windows 10 machines. Some configurations will result in a missing DLL file that prevents the program from loading at all. -- After many hours of troubleshooting I was able to finally get the missing DLL into the system. To do so, I had to install the latest version of their i1Profiler software, then install the 3+ year old version of their X-Rite Device Services software (v2.4.0, released: 10/7/2015). I do not recommend doing that. Although it worked, there are potential problems with using a system software that was created before the operating system was refined / secured. If you intend on calibrating your monitors and uninstalling it after, then it might be okay to use that method to get it to work. Keep in mind that the older version of the system software will be missing features and refinement / optimizations of the newer version, so your milage may vary. -- Once the program was able to load, it worked very well in Windows. I was able to get the three monitor gaming setup of the Windows machine to display with consistent results across all of them. There was a very slight, almost imperceivable difference, that my friend and I noticed while making an image wide enough that it covered all three 27" inch screens ... but we chalked that up to the fact that the monitors aren't the same age. Two were purchased at the same time, but two years after the first one, and all three are at least 4 years old. All things considered, the results were pretty impressive. Under MacOS it's a different story. Specifically the TouchBar MacBook Pro, which I wasn't able to get anywhere near the three PC monitors. I researched it extensively, intimately learning much more about monitor calibration. Going further and further down the rabbit hole as my calibration methods became more complex. I followed X-Rite's recommended "Linear Profile" MacOS approach, because unfortunately it's a well-documented problem (so they are very much aware of it, yet still haven't fixed the issue hence "unfortunately"). I tried calibrating for different monitor technologies, no dice. The picture ended up being significantly more orange than the Windows displays. It's telling, when the company that makes the product has a page titled "Technology Type For Apple Displays" which says, "The next update to i1Profiler will add a new Technology Type for 2016 and later MacBook Pros so current i1Display Pro users should stay with the 'White LED' Technology Type." Ummm, it's now 2019. 3 years have passed and they still haven't added the correct display technology, and still ask users to use a generic monitor technology. That is unacceptable for a piece of hardware at this price-level. It speaks volumes for their customer support, and the customer complaints in their Amazon product reviews reflect exactly that. Had I noticed those reviews before purchasing it, I might have given it a second thought. However, all is not lost. There is a way to get excellent results on any display, but not using i1Profiler. Instead, use DisplayCAL. It's a very-well designed piece of Open Source software, so it's the result of many community contributions far beyond what the X-Rite team developed. Due to the wide array of user configurations, the software makes few assumptions. Whereas X-Rite knows what their hardware does and so they program with assumptions that everything is working well, DisplayCAL doesn't know and instead tests everything. It calibrates / tests the calibrator extensively before even calibrating the monitor. You can choose the level of complexity of calibrator testing, as well as the level of complexity of monitor testing. i1Profiler maxed out at 462 color test swatches for my purposes, but with DisplayCAL I was running 4,954 color tests per calibration, and testing the calibrator for an hour before each monitor calibration. Admittedly that was beyond excessive for my needs, but I wanted to be sure / was curious, and so it took 2 to 3 hours for each calibration that I did. Trying multiple configurations, my laptop literally calibrated for 3 days straight, while I slept and did other things. Through that process I have learned that DisplayCAL's 12 minute default calibration produces very similar results as their 4,954 color calibration. Yes, there is a discernible difference if you apply the different color profiles to the monitor and look for the changes, but for most people's needs a 12 minute calibration is more than enough, and is noticeably different from the default macOS and Windows display profile calibrations. So if you can do without i1Profiler, it's possible to get excellent results across any monitor. If you need i1Profiler and are using Windows, an iMac, a Mac with an external display, or a MacBook with an older than 2016 display technology ... you will probably get great results, because all of those things are supported. In that case, I only recommend that you do not use the ambient light measurement when creating your calibration profiles. That will skew the results significantly, and should only be used if you are in an environment where the lighting never changes (and thus the lighting consistently skews the color of the monitor). If you are in an environment where the lighting varies throughout your day, disable the ambient light measurement while calibrating. Then, enable the ambient light adjustments "after" creating your color profile. It'll create a profile that doesn't factor in the color of the current light, but still allow you to dynamically adjust the brightness of the display based on the brightness of your environment; which is what most would need / want. However, if you are like me, expecting to color match your 2016 or later MBP with your iOS Devices, so that your mobile (iPad/iPhone) color workflow also matches your desktop ... that currently is impossible. X-Rite's calibration app on iOS is called ColorTrue, and it absolutely will not match a 2016+ MBP display's results. It's possible that Datacolor's Spyder Colorimeters might work better, but I haven't tested them. The X-Rite spectrophotometers (not colorimeters) would definitely work better. But X-Rite's cheapest spectrophotometers, the i1Studio Photo (EOSTUDIO, $489 on Amazon), the older ColorMunki Photo (CMUNPH, $499 on Amazon), or the more precise i1Basic Pro 2 (EO2BAS, $1,589 on Amazon) are a decent increase on investment in color accuracy. Ultimately, if you have a 2016 or later MacBook and want to use the iOS software, this hardware is a waste of time until X-Rite updates their monitor technology types. In all other cases, I can actually recommend this device. -- For me, personally this device is unusable, my MBP is my primary work machine and is the sole reason I purchased this colorimeter. So, I'll be going elsewhere. Probably the i1Studio Photo or i1Pro 2 if I can justify the cost.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Steven Hendricks Photography - Reviewed in the United States on January 16, 2018
Must have for ALL Professional Photographers.
The X-Rite i1Display Pro is a MUST HAVE for all photographers who ever plan to sell their photographs. Having a calibrated screen is an absolute must and the i1 will do it perfectly! With its ambient light detection, you don't have to worry about changing lighting conditions in your house affecting how you edit your photos. With active ambient light detection the device makes on the fly changes to your profile as lighting changes in the room. A huge bonus over the cheaper alternatives. The device will remind you at predetermined times that your calibration is due for a re-calibration (recommended once a week). Its a solid built device and easy to use. You can even use it to color correct your IPAD as long as you use the supplied app to view photos, you can guarantee the photos on your Ipad are exactly what the customer will see when you provide them with your finished work!

5.0 out of 5 stars
By LV Artist - Reviewed in the United States on August 21, 2019
Excellent Hardware. Accurate easy to use software.
I have worked professionally with color for over 2 decades. I have profiled numerous monitors and printers using colorimeters and spectrophotometers with different software applications. The X-Rite i1 Display Pro colorimeter works superbly. Fast reads, simple attachment to the monitor screen. The bundled software is easy to use. The standard number of patches or the expanded number of patches in advanced mode each yield very accurate profiles. Standard of advanced mode.....I see no difference. I use a dual monitor setup in WIndows 10. The profile created for each monitor produces identical viewing results with the same image. Follow the procedures in the software, and, make the necessary monitor hardware adjustments and the result is an accurately calibrated monitor suitable for the most demanding professional requirements.

3.0 out of 5 stars
By H. J. Seeley - Reviewed in the United States on October 16, 2018
So so for an IMac Retina display - for photograpy use
My 2010 iMac calibrated with the Spyder4 Pro really well. My new 2018 iMac with the 5K Retina is miserable with the Spyder4. Datacolor seems to never update their software, but opts to sell you new software so no matter what device you get from Datacolor it will fairly rapidly become obsolete. Based on internet info I gambled on the i1 Display Pro. It's a lot better, but I wouldn't say that it's great. You must do research to determine your backlight type which definitely is different depending on the year your iMac was made. It won't hurt to do research on what settings to use for i1 Pro as well because there are some options that are not well explained. Anyway, for me I ended up using the built in Apple color calibration tool in System Preferences/Display/Color. That has produced the best color renderings so far, based on viewing images printed and viewed on other systems. I won't say that this is the best option either but so far it's the better option. If I were to do it over again I'd just get a fast 21.5" iMac and have the factory install a bunch of RAM (since it's almost impossible to do it yourself, unlike the 27" version which is a breeze), then use the computer as my secondary (menus) display and buy a good non-Retina display as my primary display. Test a lot with the tools that came with your computer until you can determine if it doesn't work for you, then explore other options. There's no reason to buy an expensive tool and have it sit unused. And never buy a Spyder if you have a Retina display.