That product is currently unavailable. Please try a different product or see this article for help.
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")

Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")

Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
Sony X940E 4K Ultra HD High Dynamic Range Smart Android TV (75")
$2,307.80 Why this price?
Checking for changes Product info up-to-date Product info updated We've detected that this product is out of stock. Enter your email below and we will notify you when it is available.
Buy Now, Pay Later
As low as $ / mo
- month term
- No impact on credit score
- Quick & easy checkout
- Legal stuff:
Promotional Offer
Estimations exclude tax, and assume no other Klarna balances. Non-promotional balances have a 19.99% APR and a $2 monthly minimum interest charge. Accounts are subject to credit approval, and issued by WebBank, member FDIC.

Free shipping on this product


Availability: In Stock
Fulfilled by Amazon


Get it by Monday, Jul 13
Order within 6 hr 13 min

Features

  • Works with Alexa for voice control (Alexa device sold separately).
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): TV without stand: 65.9" x 40.9" x 2.5", TV with stand: 65.9" x 40.9" x 12.9"
  • Smart functionality gives you access to your favorite apps and content using Sony’s Android TV.
  • Pairs 4K Ultra HD picture clarity with the contrast, color, and detail of High Dynamic Range (HDR) for the most lifelike picture.
  • Precision Full Array boosting and dimming, you get precision contrast and incredible brightness in a stunningly slim design.
  • 120Hz native refresh rate plus Motionflow XR gives you fast moving action scenes with virtually no motion blur
  • Inputs: 4 – HDMI, 2 - USB2.0, 1 – USB3.0, 1 – Component/Composite Hybrid, 1 – Composite

Description

Enjoy 4K HDR entertainment on our X940E with Android TV. With a full-array backlight and ten times the dynamic range, this television offers dazzling contrast in an ultra-thin design. And with the incredible performance of the 4K HDR Processor X1 Extreme, everything you watch is improved to near 4K HDR quality.


Brand Name Sony


Item Weight 120 pounds


Product Dimensions 65.9 x 12.9 x 40.9 inches


Item model number XBR75X940E


Batteries 2 AA batteries required. (included)


Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No


Color Name Black


ASIN B01N1VMTBE


Customer Reviews 4.4 out of 5 stars 77 ratings 4.4 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #53,170 in Electronics (See Top 100 in Electronics) #443 in LED & LCD TVs


Date First Available January 4, 2017


Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Unless otherwise stated above, most products arrive within 2-3 business days. Larger items may take 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Features

  • Works with Alexa for voice control (Alexa device sold separately).
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): TV without stand: 65.9" x 40.9" x 2.5", TV with stand: 65.9" x 40.9" x 12.9"
  • Smart functionality gives you access to your favorite apps and content using Sony’s Android TV.
  • Pairs 4K Ultra HD picture clarity with the contrast, color, and detail of High Dynamic Range (HDR) for the most lifelike picture.
  • Precision Full Array boosting and dimming, you get precision contrast and incredible brightness in a stunningly slim design.
  • 120Hz native refresh rate plus Motionflow XR gives you fast moving action scenes with virtually no motion blur
  • Inputs: 4 – HDMI, 2 - USB2.0, 1 – USB3.0, 1 – Component/Composite Hybrid, 1 – Composite

Description

Enjoy 4K HDR entertainment on our X940E with Android TV. With a full-array backlight and ten times the dynamic range, this television offers dazzling contrast in an ultra-thin design. And with the incredible performance of the 4K HDR Processor X1 Extreme, everything you watch is improved to near 4K HDR quality.


Brand Name Sony


Item Weight 120 pounds


Product Dimensions 65.9 x 12.9 x 40.9 inches


Item model number XBR75X940E


Batteries 2 AA batteries required. (included)


Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No


Color Name Black


ASIN B01N1VMTBE


Customer Reviews 4.4 out of 5 stars 77 ratings 4.4 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #53,170 in Electronics (See Top 100 in Electronics) #443 in LED & LCD TVs


Date First Available January 4, 2017


Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Unless otherwise stated above, most products arrive within 2-3 business days. Larger items may take 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Features

  • Works with Alexa for voice control (Alexa device sold separately).
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): TV without stand: 65.9" x 40.9" x 2.5", TV with stand: 65.9" x 40.9" x 12.9"
  • Smart functionality gives you access to your favorite apps and content using Sony’s Android TV.
  • Pairs 4K Ultra HD picture clarity with the contrast, color, and detail of High Dynamic Range (HDR) for the most lifelike picture.
  • Precision Full Array boosting and dimming, you get precision contrast and incredible brightness in a stunningly slim design.
  • 120Hz native refresh rate plus Motionflow XR gives you fast moving action scenes with virtually no motion blur
  • Inputs: 4 – HDMI, 2 - USB2.0, 1 – USB3.0, 1 – Component/Composite Hybrid, 1 – Composite

Description

Enjoy 4K HDR entertainment on our X940E with Android TV. With a full-array backlight and ten times the dynamic range, this television offers dazzling contrast in an ultra-thin design. And with the incredible performance of the 4K HDR Processor X1 Extreme, everything you watch is improved to near 4K HDR quality.


Brand Name Sony


Item Weight 120 pounds


Product Dimensions 65.9 x 12.9 x 40.9 inches


Item model number XBR75X940E


Batteries 2 AA batteries required. (included)


Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No


Color Name Black


ASIN B01N1VMTBE


Customer Reviews 4.4 out of 5 stars 77 ratings 4.4 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #53,170 in Electronics (See Top 100 in Electronics) #443 in LED & LCD TVs


Date First Available January 4, 2017


abunda_amazon_reviews OK, six grand is not chicken feed so you expect a good picture. I think a true rating would be 4.6 stars. So 5 was as close as I could get. I looked at and researched a lot of TVs. I was replacing a 65" 2014 Samsung HU8550 w/ 2015 evelution kit. So a very fine TV in it's own right. I wanted 75" and HDR as that is where the 4K movies have gone. This TV does not disappoint! It is paired with s new Sony STR-DN1080 receiver and a Sony UBP-X800. A 4k HDR movie is stunning, even blu ray and DVD content is processed and creates an absolutely beautiful picticure. Clarity in fast moving scenes is the best I have seen. I am glad I chose the 940E over the 900E. Granted a $1700 choice with the 900E being priced at $4300. Still the additional processing power I think pays off. I am truly pleased with the purchase! A very fine TV. In a dark room, in a light room it does equally well. Early tech reviews stated that the only real flaw is the relatively shallow viewing angle. Stating that more than 20 degrees off center the picture began to decline (blacks not as deep, etc.). I find it to be almost perfect to 35 degrees. If you are looking for a 75" TV this one is very hard to beat. This is s great set. G;;Reviewed in the United States on May 12, 2017;;5.0 out of 5 stars;;six grand is not chicken feed so you expect a good picture. I think a true rating would be ...;;Sickone;;;I've had a Sony 940E for approximately three months now. A summary of my experiences would be that the Sony 940E is great for: 4K HDR blu rays (via my Oppo UDP-203 player) 1080p Blu Rays (which I usually rip losslessly to my Plex Server and watch via an NVidia Shield rather than deal with the discs). My 1080p SDR blu ray collection has never looked better than when upscaled to 75" and 4K on this 940E, and then "augmented" a little bit with "medium" local dimming, "Low" smooth gradations, and occassionally some "medium" XTended Dynamic Range. 4K HDR streaming media (Netflix and Amazon) Most, if not all, 1080p streaming (Especially Netflix, Amazon, Vudu, etc) A lot of (but not all) broadcast cable (compressed) 1080i/720p content, INCLUDING LIVE SPORTS (NBC Sunday Night Football, for example) The Sony 940E is good/fair/adequate enough for: The remainder of cable (compressed) 1080i/720p content that I wouldn't call "great" up above (BTN football, for example, more heavily compressed by my cable provider (comcast) then an NBC broadcast is) Casual gaming The Sony 940E is not particularly good (nice way of saying "poor") for: -480p DVD, or worse yet 480i broadcast SD TV... the upscaling on this TV is quite good, but nothing's going to "save you" at that low of a resolution, optimized for 19" 4:3 TVs of two decades ago, when trying to stretch that image out all the way to 75" - Serious/hardcore gamers. The impact of the "slow" pixel response time, as measured/reported several other places, including RTings review, has been blown way out of proportion as it relates to enjoying live sports. I've personally never seen motion-handling ("processing") done anything remotely as well as on these 2017 Sony TVs (one of, if not THE #1 reason, to pick this set over a competitor option). The interpolation (which Sony calls "smoothness") and black frame insertion (which Sony calls "clearness") really works here for Live sports and scrolling News tickers. But I cannot/will not recommend it for a serious/avid gamer. From what I've read, gamers should take a good hard look at the Sony 900E instead. You step down in terms of the FALD implementation (more on that later) compared to the 940E, and you lose support for Dolby Vision (which is supposed to be coming to 940E via a firmware update, but as of the writing of this review still hasn't arrived). I don't have a 900E. I'm not, and haven't been for almost 10 years now, what I'd call a "serious gamer". This recommendation is based on what I"ve read/heard. But I have played some video games on this 940E, and anything other than just casual laid back gameplay has given me a pretty serious feeling of nausea and/or dizziness/headache. I think this is the slower-than-ideal pixel response time in affect, and potentially the Sony's motion-processing trying to hide/fix it... it's really a poor experience. I can't do it for anything "serious" (1st/3rd person shooters, for example). Just to give you a feel for who I am and where I'm coming from, in order to give you a better understanding of how my perceptions/review might relate to you, I am not a "professional" reviewer or critic. I am an enthusiast who tends to buy exactly "this kind of gear", where I'd call a Sony 940E a "higher-endish-product" that cuts well above the "midpoint" of the market, both in price and performance, but isn't the very very tippy-tippy-top highest-end-product out there (like a Sony CLETUS or a 100" Z9D, for example). I'm also the kind of person who has always been willing to invest $30 or so dollars in a calibration disc and several hours of my time futzing/obsessing over various picture settings (complete with my own spreadsheet breakdowns and notes, combing through AVSForums posters and RTings reviews, etc), but never went so far as to buy "expensive" options like dedicated computer software and meters (CallMan, etc). I'm the same way with my audio gear. I don't have a dedicated several-hundred-dollar mic that I've used to calibrate a pair of magnepan speakers that cost as much as a car, but I always run the audyssey EQ room correction that comes built into my AVR, using the microphone that came with the AVR, to calibrate my 5.1 audio system that is probably approximately the audio equivalent of using a Sony 940E for video. It's better-than-average. It's not Top Of The Line, and my calibration/settings practices wouldn't be "up to snuff" from a professional's perspective. To me, the reasons to buy a 940E are as follows: 1) Size matters, and (when watching high-quality content like the things I mentioned as "great" up above) 75" is glorious. The Society of Motion Picture & Television Engineers recommends that video is best enjoyed on a screen that's *at least* filling 30 degrees of your Field Of View... some basic trig can solve for just how big a 16:9 diagonal needs to get for your viewing distance, but most people would be shocked to learn just how big their TV needs to be to fill up that much of their vision at a standard distance of 8 feet, 10 feet, 12 feet, etc, that most people's living room seating is going to be based on regardless of how big the TV is (most people don't make their furniture-arrangement-decisions based on the size of the TV; the room is what the room is, the furniture belongs where it belongs based on that, and therefore you Field of View is set in stone based on whatever length that is relative to however big a TV you buy). At what I'll call a "standard viewing distance" of 10 feet for a lot of people's living room's, a 75" (diagonal) TV *just* hits that sweet spot, and (barely) gets you to that 30 degree Field of View. [note: THX actually recommends 40 degrees of Field of View, which requires incredibly large screen size at "normal" distances] 2) HDR is amazing, and this thing excels at providing a great HDR experience for two different (complimentary) reasons: 2a) Peak Brightness. This thing is able to get VERY bright when it wants to, which means it can really create a lot of contrast between the brightest-brights and the darkest-darks. This also helps a lot for tone-mapping, when the mastered material often asks for higher peak brightness than a lot of other sets (including OLED) can achieve, and when watching HDR10 material (not-dynamic metadata) all data for the entire film then gets mapped down accordingly. 2b) Full Array Local Dimming (FALD) backlighting, with a really big impressive (256?) array of backlights, and good processing/software implementation of how/when to use them. This allows the 940E to do a great job of CONTROLLING all that light capability it has. It can limit that super-bright-capability to a very localized part of the screen, and control/reduce blooming and light bleed, in a way that LCD sets taht rely on Edge Lighting simlpy can't compete with. 3) Sony is #1 right now when it comes to motion processing. The motion handling here really is amazing. Nobody else is doing it better. The "negative" marks for motion that it gets are based on a black object moving against a white background, and it's true, the pixel response time is slower-than-ideal here, but for real-world usage, I find this thing is 99% as good for live-action-sports as every other HDTV in my house is, including my 58" plasma (near-zero pixel response). OLED does a *lot* of things right. And it's better than LCD, including a 940E, in several ways. Certainly when it comes to perfectly-dark blacks, and fast pixel response, OLED wins. But it's not a clean-sweep across the board. Some OLEDs (particularly 2016 LGs, for example) have problems with near-blacks (black-crush), which, for me at least, partially-negated the advantage they have when it comes to black level. And issues/complaints about judder on OLEDs aren't uncommon, which I haven't have problems with on my 940E. And finally, size matters. I could have bought a 65" OLED for less money than I spent on this 75" 940E, but a similarly-sized OLED (77") is prohibitively priced, for me at least. My viewing distance being on the larger/longer side of things at 13', I knew I wanted to make a big step up, in size, from the 52" 1080p LCD I'd been using in my living room. At 75", this thing has been an amazing improvement. Things that aren't great about the 940E: -The built-in OS isn't good. And it's not because "Android stinks", I'll argue all day that "Android", and even "AndroidTV", really is pretty great. I own a Pixel phone, a Galaxy TabS (10.5") tablet, and five (yes five) NVidia Shield Android TV boxes, which I use to watch EVERYTHING (live TV/DVR via cablecard, streaming subscriptions like Netflix/Amazon/HBO, blu ray rips via Plex, etc) other than 4K HDR blu ray on my Sony 940E (I use an OPPO UDP-203 for 4K HDR blu rays, FWIW). But the AndroidTV experience that comes built-in to this TV really is poor. For $200, NVidia makes the same OS work *really* well. So, to me at least, this clearly means Sony cheaped out on the built-in hardware that's dedicated to running the Android S. This is part of the challenge/perception problem that Android faces, when someone spends more than $4000 on a TV and has such a poor Android experience, they're understandably going to be salty about that, and if they have never owned/used an NVidia Shield, they may blame the OS rather than the hardware running the OS... - Gaming in any sort of serious fashion (already discussed above - in short, the slow pixel response time I think is to blame, and I get nausea/dizzy any time I try to play a 1st person/3rd person shooter, which is something I DO NOT experience on any other TV/laptop in my house, all of which have faster pixel response times than this thing... which I do not believe is a coincidence). - "Low resolution" viewing... when you stretch a low-rez image all the way up to 75", it's not great. The upscaling of 1080p uncompressed blu ray content truly is incredible, and your old blu ray collection will come to life and look better than it ever has before, but 480p DVDs look rough at this size... this shouldn't be surprising to hear, but I mention it anyway, for completeness. All in all, as long as you don't want to play video games on it, I strongly recommend this TV to anyone who wants a LARGE set that will deliver VERY GOOD PICTURE QUALITY, and sports fans among us need not avoid this set because of the pixel resposne time and subsequent poor "motion" ratings it's received from various review websites. What they said is true. The Pixel response time is slow. But for real-world (not black-dot-on-white-screen) viewing of live action sports, the various motion settings on this TV can be used to calibrate out any motion problems I noticed outta the box. But before you spend this kind of cash, don't jus take my word for it; I definitely recommend you check out other reviews on it, particularly those from sources I personally like/respect, such as RTings, HDTVTest (videos on youtube), and AVS Forums. UPDATE - March 27, 2018 I'm deducting 1 star for the poor implementation of the "Dolby Vision Update", which only is supported for internal Sony 940E apps (see above for my review/opinion of the internal apps; not great). My top-of-the-line OPPO UDP-203 4K UHD blu ray player, which supports Dolby Vision, can't pass Dolby Vision along to my $4,000+ 75" Sony TV. My opinion hasn't changed, in that I still believe Dolby Vision means more for lower-peak-brightness OLEDs than it does this sort of High Peak Brightness LCD. I don't think it's "ruined" this TV. But it was a promised feature, and this is a half-arsed implementation that nobody thought was even possible before Sony did it. It likely protects Sony from any legal action, as they did legally provide the Dolby Vision update they promised; but this isn't the Dolby Vision update this TV deserves, and the price point for this set was, IMO, a "no compromises" price point, and this is a compromise. So now I feel like I overpaid, and I'm frustrated, and I'm docking a star as a result. It's probably too late to sway anyone's opinions, but just in case it isn't, be advised: Dolby Vision is (currently) only supported for native apps, NOT external inputs.;;Reviewed in the United States on November 21, 2017;;4.0 out of 5 stars;;Awesome set for pretty much everything (including sports) OTHER THAN gaming;;Tim;;;Summary: The TV is beautiful. I was worried about the motion blur issues mentioned in the rtings.com review, but, after spending a day watching both 4K Blu-ray content and playing 4K Xbox One X games, I'm glad to say that whatever weakness might be present doesn't register on me as a viewer or gamer. I love it. What I didn't love was running into Amazon's recent change in practice around price protection for large TV's. A truly disappointing experience. If you care about price protection on a large purchase like this, you're going to want to buy someplace else. Details Before turning it on, the first thing I noticed was the minimalist, narrow, flat, black bezel Sony is using. A much cleaner look than a metal or raised bezel. Almost looks like a flat sheet of glass. Dimensionally, it's a little deeper than the set it replaced (2" vs 1"). It sits a little further off the wall, but I like the overall look and I'm very satisfied with the result. Initial setup was no more or less complicated than the Samsung 4K TV it replaced -- which is to say, not as easy as it could be. If you have an HDR source, make sure you find the "Enhanced HDMI" setting to enable HDR input. (Home->Settings->External Inputs.) I could see being bothered by the Android menus if I was using them regularly ... but if you're like me, and mainly using the TV set on a single HDMI input, with a receiver managing external sources, you're rarely going to use the TV menus. One nit ... TV gives no indication that it's playing HDR content when you hit the Display button -- just shows resolution and aspect ratio. My Samsung identified HDR content, which was a convenient way to know everything was working right, as the whole HDR chain can be a little finicky to get set up. [Sony, if you're reading ... love to see this in a firmware update.] Dynamic range is really where this set stands out for me. When I compare it to the edge-lit Samsung un75ks900d (which sadly died on me and was unrepairable) what's immediately noticeable is how much blacker, black is. In a dark room ... it's genuinely hard to find the edges of the screen for dark content, and an all-black frame emits almost no light. My first test material was the sandstorm scene in mad max (4K, HDR). In a light-controlled room, the lightning strikes have a level of visual punch that makes the whole thing a pretty spectacular experience. As I mentioned above, was worried about the reported motion issues, but I don't see an issue (and I'm going to do myself a favor and not learn to recognize whatever technical issues might actually be present and just enjoy the set). Overall, first 48 hours... and I love the TV. Sadly, what I don't love is Amazon's recent change in practice around price protection for large TV purchases. Don't think it's ever been official policy, but until earlier this year, it appears they've had a practice of offering price adjustments within the 7-day return window. In my case, price dropped the day the TV arrived (Amazon the seller in both cases). Called Amazon the next day, and figured this would be the usual kind of straight-forward and delightful experience that I have come to expect from Amazon. They offered me only the option of returning the current TV for a full refund and ordering a new one. I have no real issue with this being Amazon's policy for smaller items where they don't want to manage requests for trivial price adjustments. That's a minor inconvenience. But for a 100-pound television, where the price drop can be far from trivial, to learn my only path for credit is to arrange to be present for delivery and pickup and to go thru install and set up a 2nd time -- this isn't a minor inconvenience. This is just disrespectful of my time and absurd (Amazon paying for two special deliveries and someone's eating the cost of a TV that can't be sold as new). I can't really recommend purchasing any large, expensive, television from Amazon, for as long as this remains their practice. Go buy somewhere that'll give you a no hassle credit for a price drop during the return window.;;Reviewed in the United States on November 21, 2017;;5.0 out of 5 stars;;Beautiful TV. If you want price protection, you're going to want to buy it somewhere else.;;Ian Carmichael

Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Orders placed now will arrive in 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Top Amazon Reviews


5.0 out of 5 stars
By Sickone - Reviewed in the United States on May 12, 2017
six grand is not chicken feed so you expect a good picture. I think a true rating would be ...
OK, six grand is not chicken feed so you expect a good picture. I think a true rating would be 4.6 stars. So 5 was as close as I could get. I looked at and researched a lot of TVs. I was replacing a 65" 2014 Samsung HU8550 w/ 2015 evelution kit. So a very fine TV in it's own right. I wanted 75" and HDR as that is where the 4K movies have gone. This TV does not disappoint! It is paired with s new Sony STR-DN1080 receiver and a Sony UBP-X800. A 4k HDR movie is stunning, even blu ray and DVD content is processed and creates an absolutely beautiful picticure. Clarity in fast moving scenes is the best I have seen. I am glad I chose the 940E over the 900E. Granted a $1700 choice with the 900E being priced at $4300. Still the additional processing power I think pays off. I am truly pleased with the purchase! A very fine TV. In a dark room, in a light room it does equally well. Early tech reviews stated that the only real flaw is the relatively shallow viewing angle. Stating that more than 20 degrees off center the picture began to decline (blacks not as deep, etc.). I find it to be almost perfect to 35 degrees. If you are looking for a 75" TV this one is very hard to beat. This is s great set. G

4.0 out of 5 stars
By Tim - Reviewed in the United States on November 21, 2017
Awesome set for pretty much everything (including sports) OTHER THAN gaming
I've had a Sony 940E for approximately three months now. A summary of my experiences would be that the Sony 940E is great for: 4K HDR blu rays (via my Oppo UDP-203 player) 1080p Blu Rays (which I usually rip losslessly to my Plex Server and watch via an NVidia Shield rather than deal with the discs). My 1080p SDR blu ray collection has never looked better than when upscaled to 75" and 4K on this 940E, and then "augmented" a little bit with "medium" local dimming, "Low" smooth gradations, and occassionally some "medium" XTended Dynamic Range. 4K HDR streaming media (Netflix and Amazon) Most, if not all, 1080p streaming (Especially Netflix, Amazon, Vudu, etc) A lot of (but not all) broadcast cable (compressed) 1080i/720p content, INCLUDING LIVE SPORTS (NBC Sunday Night Football, for example) The Sony 940E is good/fair/adequate enough for: The remainder of cable (compressed) 1080i/720p content that I wouldn't call "great" up above (BTN football, for example, more heavily compressed by my cable provider (comcast) then an NBC broadcast is) Casual gaming The Sony 940E is not particularly good (nice way of saying "poor") for: -480p DVD, or worse yet 480i broadcast SD TV... the upscaling on this TV is quite good, but nothing's going to "save you" at that low of a resolution, optimized for 19" 4:3 TVs of two decades ago, when trying to stretch that image out all the way to 75" - Serious/hardcore gamers. The impact of the "slow" pixel response time, as measured/reported several other places, including RTings review, has been blown way out of proportion as it relates to enjoying live sports. I've personally never seen motion-handling ("processing") done anything remotely as well as on these 2017 Sony TVs (one of, if not THE #1 reason, to pick this set over a competitor option). The interpolation (which Sony calls "smoothness") and black frame insertion (which Sony calls "clearness") really works here for Live sports and scrolling News tickers. But I cannot/will not recommend it for a serious/avid gamer. From what I've read, gamers should take a good hard look at the Sony 900E instead. You step down in terms of the FALD implementation (more on that later) compared to the 940E, and you lose support for Dolby Vision (which is supposed to be coming to 940E via a firmware update, but as of the writing of this review still hasn't arrived). I don't have a 900E. I'm not, and haven't been for almost 10 years now, what I'd call a "serious gamer". This recommendation is based on what I"ve read/heard. But I have played some video games on this 940E, and anything other than just casual laid back gameplay has given me a pretty serious feeling of nausea and/or dizziness/headache. I think this is the slower-than-ideal pixel response time in affect, and potentially the Sony's motion-processing trying to hide/fix it... it's really a poor experience. I can't do it for anything "serious" (1st/3rd person shooters, for example). Just to give you a feel for who I am and where I'm coming from, in order to give you a better understanding of how my perceptions/review might relate to you, I am not a "professional" reviewer or critic. I am an enthusiast who tends to buy exactly "this kind of gear", where I'd call a Sony 940E a "higher-endish-product" that cuts well above the "midpoint" of the market, both in price and performance, but isn't the very very tippy-tippy-top highest-end-product out there (like a Sony CLETUS or a 100" Z9D, for example). I'm also the kind of person who has always been willing to invest $30 or so dollars in a calibration disc and several hours of my time futzing/obsessing over various picture settings (complete with my own spreadsheet breakdowns and notes, combing through AVSForums posters and RTings reviews, etc), but never went so far as to buy "expensive" options like dedicated computer software and meters (CallMan, etc). I'm the same way with my audio gear. I don't have a dedicated several-hundred-dollar mic that I've used to calibrate a pair of magnepan speakers that cost as much as a car, but I always run the audyssey EQ room correction that comes built into my AVR, using the microphone that came with the AVR, to calibrate my 5.1 audio system that is probably approximately the audio equivalent of using a Sony 940E for video. It's better-than-average. It's not Top Of The Line, and my calibration/settings practices wouldn't be "up to snuff" from a professional's perspective. To me, the reasons to buy a 940E are as follows: 1) Size matters, and (when watching high-quality content like the things I mentioned as "great" up above) 75" is glorious. The Society of Motion Picture & Television Engineers recommends that video is best enjoyed on a screen that's *at least* filling 30 degrees of your Field Of View... some basic trig can solve for just how big a 16:9 diagonal needs to get for your viewing distance, but most people would be shocked to learn just how big their TV needs to be to fill up that much of their vision at a standard distance of 8 feet, 10 feet, 12 feet, etc, that most people's living room seating is going to be based on regardless of how big the TV is (most people don't make their furniture-arrangement-decisions based on the size of the TV; the room is what the room is, the furniture belongs where it belongs based on that, and therefore you Field of View is set in stone based on whatever length that is relative to however big a TV you buy). At what I'll call a "standard viewing distance" of 10 feet for a lot of people's living room's, a 75" (diagonal) TV *just* hits that sweet spot, and (barely) gets you to that 30 degree Field of View. [note: THX actually recommends 40 degrees of Field of View, which requires incredibly large screen size at "normal" distances] 2) HDR is amazing, and this thing excels at providing a great HDR experience for two different (complimentary) reasons: 2a) Peak Brightness. This thing is able to get VERY bright when it wants to, which means it can really create a lot of contrast between the brightest-brights and the darkest-darks. This also helps a lot for tone-mapping, when the mastered material often asks for higher peak brightness than a lot of other sets (including OLED) can achieve, and when watching HDR10 material (not-dynamic metadata) all data for the entire film then gets mapped down accordingly. 2b) Full Array Local Dimming (FALD) backlighting, with a really big impressive (256?) array of backlights, and good processing/software implementation of how/when to use them. This allows the 940E to do a great job of CONTROLLING all that light capability it has. It can limit that super-bright-capability to a very localized part of the screen, and control/reduce blooming and light bleed, in a way that LCD sets taht rely on Edge Lighting simlpy can't compete with. 3) Sony is #1 right now when it comes to motion processing. The motion handling here really is amazing. Nobody else is doing it better. The "negative" marks for motion that it gets are based on a black object moving against a white background, and it's true, the pixel response time is slower-than-ideal here, but for real-world usage, I find this thing is 99% as good for live-action-sports as every other HDTV in my house is, including my 58" plasma (near-zero pixel response). OLED does a *lot* of things right. And it's better than LCD, including a 940E, in several ways. Certainly when it comes to perfectly-dark blacks, and fast pixel response, OLED wins. But it's not a clean-sweep across the board. Some OLEDs (particularly 2016 LGs, for example) have problems with near-blacks (black-crush), which, for me at least, partially-negated the advantage they have when it comes to black level. And issues/complaints about judder on OLEDs aren't uncommon, which I haven't have problems with on my 940E. And finally, size matters. I could have bought a 65" OLED for less money than I spent on this 75" 940E, but a similarly-sized OLED (77") is prohibitively priced, for me at least. My viewing distance being on the larger/longer side of things at 13', I knew I wanted to make a big step up, in size, from the 52" 1080p LCD I'd been using in my living room. At 75", this thing has been an amazing improvement. Things that aren't great about the 940E: -The built-in OS isn't good. And it's not because "Android stinks", I'll argue all day that "Android", and even "AndroidTV", really is pretty great. I own a Pixel phone, a Galaxy TabS (10.5") tablet, and five (yes five) NVidia Shield Android TV boxes, which I use to watch EVERYTHING (live TV/DVR via cablecard, streaming subscriptions like Netflix/Amazon/HBO, blu ray rips via Plex, etc) other than 4K HDR blu ray on my Sony 940E (I use an OPPO UDP-203 for 4K HDR blu rays, FWIW). But the AndroidTV experience that comes built-in to this TV really is poor. For $200, NVidia makes the same OS work *really* well. So, to me at least, this clearly means Sony cheaped out on the built-in hardware that's dedicated to running the Android S. This is part of the challenge/perception problem that Android faces, when someone spends more than $4000 on a TV and has such a poor Android experience, they're understandably going to be salty about that, and if they have never owned/used an NVidia Shield, they may blame the OS rather than the hardware running the OS... - Gaming in any sort of serious fashion (already discussed above - in short, the slow pixel response time I think is to blame, and I get nausea/dizzy any time I try to play a 1st person/3rd person shooter, which is something I DO NOT experience on any other TV/laptop in my house, all of which have faster pixel response times than this thing... which I do not believe is a coincidence). - "Low resolution" viewing... when you stretch a low-rez image all the way up to 75", it's not great. The upscaling of 1080p uncompressed blu ray content truly is incredible, and your old blu ray collection will come to life and look better than it ever has before, but 480p DVDs look rough at this size... this shouldn't be surprising to hear, but I mention it anyway, for completeness. All in all, as long as you don't want to play video games on it, I strongly recommend this TV to anyone who wants a LARGE set that will deliver VERY GOOD PICTURE QUALITY, and sports fans among us need not avoid this set because of the pixel resposne time and subsequent poor "motion" ratings it's received from various review websites. What they said is true. The Pixel response time is slow. But for real-world (not black-dot-on-white-screen) viewing of live action sports, the various motion settings on this TV can be used to calibrate out any motion problems I noticed outta the box. But before you spend this kind of cash, don't jus take my word for it; I definitely recommend you check out other reviews on it, particularly those from sources I personally like/respect, such as RTings, HDTVTest (videos on youtube), and AVS Forums. UPDATE - March 27, 2018 I'm deducting 1 star for the poor implementation of the "Dolby Vision Update", which only is supported for internal Sony 940E apps (see above for my review/opinion of the internal apps; not great). My top-of-the-line OPPO UDP-203 4K UHD blu ray player, which supports Dolby Vision, can't pass Dolby Vision along to my $4,000+ 75" Sony TV. My opinion hasn't changed, in that I still believe Dolby Vision means more for lower-peak-brightness OLEDs than it does this sort of High Peak Brightness LCD. I don't think it's "ruined" this TV. But it was a promised feature, and this is a half-arsed implementation that nobody thought was even possible before Sony did it. It likely protects Sony from any legal action, as they did legally provide the Dolby Vision update they promised; but this isn't the Dolby Vision update this TV deserves, and the price point for this set was, IMO, a "no compromises" price point, and this is a compromise. So now I feel like I overpaid, and I'm frustrated, and I'm docking a star as a result. It's probably too late to sway anyone's opinions, but just in case it isn't, be advised: Dolby Vision is (currently) only supported for native apps, NOT external inputs.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Ian Carmichael - Reviewed in the United States on November 21, 2017
Beautiful TV. If you want price protection, you're going to want to buy it somewhere else.
Summary: The TV is beautiful. I was worried about the motion blur issues mentioned in the rtings.com review, but, after spending a day watching both 4K Blu-ray content and playing 4K Xbox One X games, I'm glad to say that whatever weakness might be present doesn't register on me as a viewer or gamer. I love it. What I didn't love was running into Amazon's recent change in practice around price protection for large TV's. A truly disappointing experience. If you care about price protection on a large purchase like this, you're going to want to buy someplace else. Details Before turning it on, the first thing I noticed was the minimalist, narrow, flat, black bezel Sony is using. A much cleaner look than a metal or raised bezel. Almost looks like a flat sheet of glass. Dimensionally, it's a little deeper than the set it replaced (2" vs 1"). It sits a little further off the wall, but I like the overall look and I'm very satisfied with the result. Initial setup was no more or less complicated than the Samsung 4K TV it replaced -- which is to say, not as easy as it could be. If you have an HDR source, make sure you find the "Enhanced HDMI" setting to enable HDR input. (Home->Settings->External Inputs.) I could see being bothered by the Android menus if I was using them regularly ... but if you're like me, and mainly using the TV set on a single HDMI input, with a receiver managing external sources, you're rarely going to use the TV menus. One nit ... TV gives no indication that it's playing HDR content when you hit the Display button -- just shows resolution and aspect ratio. My Samsung identified HDR content, which was a convenient way to know everything was working right, as the whole HDR chain can be a little finicky to get set up. [Sony, if you're reading ... love to see this in a firmware update.] Dynamic range is really where this set stands out for me. When I compare it to the edge-lit Samsung un75ks900d (which sadly died on me and was unrepairable) what's immediately noticeable is how much blacker, black is. In a dark room ... it's genuinely hard to find the edges of the screen for dark content, and an all-black frame emits almost no light. My first test material was the sandstorm scene in mad max (4K, HDR). In a light-controlled room, the lightning strikes have a level of visual punch that makes the whole thing a pretty spectacular experience. As I mentioned above, was worried about the reported motion issues, but I don't see an issue (and I'm going to do myself a favor and not learn to recognize whatever technical issues might actually be present and just enjoy the set). Overall, first 48 hours... and I love the TV. Sadly, what I don't love is Amazon's recent change in practice around price protection for large TV purchases. Don't think it's ever been official policy, but until earlier this year, it appears they've had a practice of offering price adjustments within the 7-day return window. In my case, price dropped the day the TV arrived (Amazon the seller in both cases). Called Amazon the next day, and figured this would be the usual kind of straight-forward and delightful experience that I have come to expect from Amazon. They offered me only the option of returning the current TV for a full refund and ordering a new one. I have no real issue with this being Amazon's policy for smaller items where they don't want to manage requests for trivial price adjustments. That's a minor inconvenience. But for a 100-pound television, where the price drop can be far from trivial, to learn my only path for credit is to arrange to be present for delivery and pickup and to go thru install and set up a 2nd time -- this isn't a minor inconvenience. This is just disrespectful of my time and absurd (Amazon paying for two special deliveries and someone's eating the cost of a TV that can't be sold as new). I can't really recommend purchasing any large, expensive, television from Amazon, for as long as this remains their practice. Go buy somewhere that'll give you a no hassle credit for a price drop during the return window.

Recent Reviews


5.0 out of 5 stars
By Sickone - Reviewed in the United States on May 12, 2017
six grand is not chicken feed so you expect a good picture. I think a true rating would be ...
OK, six grand is not chicken feed so you expect a good picture. I think a true rating would be 4.6 stars. So 5 was as close as I could get. I looked at and researched a lot of TVs. I was replacing a 65" 2014 Samsung HU8550 w/ 2015 evelution kit. So a very fine TV in it's own right. I wanted 75" and HDR as that is where the 4K movies have gone. This TV does not disappoint! It is paired with s new Sony STR-DN1080 receiver and a Sony UBP-X800. A 4k HDR movie is stunning, even blu ray and DVD content is processed and creates an absolutely beautiful picticure. Clarity in fast moving scenes is the best I have seen. I am glad I chose the 940E over the 900E. Granted a $1700 choice with the 900E being priced at $4300. Still the additional processing power I think pays off. I am truly pleased with the purchase! A very fine TV. In a dark room, in a light room it does equally well. Early tech reviews stated that the only real flaw is the relatively shallow viewing angle. Stating that more than 20 degrees off center the picture began to decline (blacks not as deep, etc.). I find it to be almost perfect to 35 degrees. If you are looking for a 75" TV this one is very hard to beat. This is s great set. G

4.0 out of 5 stars
By Tim - Reviewed in the United States on November 21, 2017
Awesome set for pretty much everything (including sports) OTHER THAN gaming
I've had a Sony 940E for approximately three months now. A summary of my experiences would be that the Sony 940E is great for: 4K HDR blu rays (via my Oppo UDP-203 player) 1080p Blu Rays (which I usually rip losslessly to my Plex Server and watch via an NVidia Shield rather than deal with the discs). My 1080p SDR blu ray collection has never looked better than when upscaled to 75" and 4K on this 940E, and then "augmented" a little bit with "medium" local dimming, "Low" smooth gradations, and occassionally some "medium" XTended Dynamic Range. 4K HDR streaming media (Netflix and Amazon) Most, if not all, 1080p streaming (Especially Netflix, Amazon, Vudu, etc) A lot of (but not all) broadcast cable (compressed) 1080i/720p content, INCLUDING LIVE SPORTS (NBC Sunday Night Football, for example) The Sony 940E is good/fair/adequate enough for: The remainder of cable (compressed) 1080i/720p content that I wouldn't call "great" up above (BTN football, for example, more heavily compressed by my cable provider (comcast) then an NBC broadcast is) Casual gaming The Sony 940E is not particularly good (nice way of saying "poor") for: -480p DVD, or worse yet 480i broadcast SD TV... the upscaling on this TV is quite good, but nothing's going to "save you" at that low of a resolution, optimized for 19" 4:3 TVs of two decades ago, when trying to stretch that image out all the way to 75" - Serious/hardcore gamers. The impact of the "slow" pixel response time, as measured/reported several other places, including RTings review, has been blown way out of proportion as it relates to enjoying live sports. I've personally never seen motion-handling ("processing") done anything remotely as well as on these 2017 Sony TVs (one of, if not THE #1 reason, to pick this set over a competitor option). The interpolation (which Sony calls "smoothness") and black frame insertion (which Sony calls "clearness") really works here for Live sports and scrolling News tickers. But I cannot/will not recommend it for a serious/avid gamer. From what I've read, gamers should take a good hard look at the Sony 900E instead. You step down in terms of the FALD implementation (more on that later) compared to the 940E, and you lose support for Dolby Vision (which is supposed to be coming to 940E via a firmware update, but as of the writing of this review still hasn't arrived). I don't have a 900E. I'm not, and haven't been for almost 10 years now, what I'd call a "serious gamer". This recommendation is based on what I"ve read/heard. But I have played some video games on this 940E, and anything other than just casual laid back gameplay has given me a pretty serious feeling of nausea and/or dizziness/headache. I think this is the slower-than-ideal pixel response time in affect, and potentially the Sony's motion-processing trying to hide/fix it... it's really a poor experience. I can't do it for anything "serious" (1st/3rd person shooters, for example). Just to give you a feel for who I am and where I'm coming from, in order to give you a better understanding of how my perceptions/review might relate to you, I am not a "professional" reviewer or critic. I am an enthusiast who tends to buy exactly "this kind of gear", where I'd call a Sony 940E a "higher-endish-product" that cuts well above the "midpoint" of the market, both in price and performance, but isn't the very very tippy-tippy-top highest-end-product out there (like a Sony CLETUS or a 100" Z9D, for example). I'm also the kind of person who has always been willing to invest $30 or so dollars in a calibration disc and several hours of my time futzing/obsessing over various picture settings (complete with my own spreadsheet breakdowns and notes, combing through AVSForums posters and RTings reviews, etc), but never went so far as to buy "expensive" options like dedicated computer software and meters (CallMan, etc). I'm the same way with my audio gear. I don't have a dedicated several-hundred-dollar mic that I've used to calibrate a pair of magnepan speakers that cost as much as a car, but I always run the audyssey EQ room correction that comes built into my AVR, using the microphone that came with the AVR, to calibrate my 5.1 audio system that is probably approximately the audio equivalent of using a Sony 940E for video. It's better-than-average. It's not Top Of The Line, and my calibration/settings practices wouldn't be "up to snuff" from a professional's perspective. To me, the reasons to buy a 940E are as follows: 1) Size matters, and (when watching high-quality content like the things I mentioned as "great" up above) 75" is glorious. The Society of Motion Picture & Television Engineers recommends that video is best enjoyed on a screen that's *at least* filling 30 degrees of your Field Of View... some basic trig can solve for just how big a 16:9 diagonal needs to get for your viewing distance, but most people would be shocked to learn just how big their TV needs to be to fill up that much of their vision at a standard distance of 8 feet, 10 feet, 12 feet, etc, that most people's living room seating is going to be based on regardless of how big the TV is (most people don't make their furniture-arrangement-decisions based on the size of the TV; the room is what the room is, the furniture belongs where it belongs based on that, and therefore you Field of View is set in stone based on whatever length that is relative to however big a TV you buy). At what I'll call a "standard viewing distance" of 10 feet for a lot of people's living room's, a 75" (diagonal) TV *just* hits that sweet spot, and (barely) gets you to that 30 degree Field of View. [note: THX actually recommends 40 degrees of Field of View, which requires incredibly large screen size at "normal" distances] 2) HDR is amazing, and this thing excels at providing a great HDR experience for two different (complimentary) reasons: 2a) Peak Brightness. This thing is able to get VERY bright when it wants to, which means it can really create a lot of contrast between the brightest-brights and the darkest-darks. This also helps a lot for tone-mapping, when the mastered material often asks for higher peak brightness than a lot of other sets (including OLED) can achieve, and when watching HDR10 material (not-dynamic metadata) all data for the entire film then gets mapped down accordingly. 2b) Full Array Local Dimming (FALD) backlighting, with a really big impressive (256?) array of backlights, and good processing/software implementation of how/when to use them. This allows the 940E to do a great job of CONTROLLING all that light capability it has. It can limit that super-bright-capability to a very localized part of the screen, and control/reduce blooming and light bleed, in a way that LCD sets taht rely on Edge Lighting simlpy can't compete with. 3) Sony is #1 right now when it comes to motion processing. The motion handling here really is amazing. Nobody else is doing it better. The "negative" marks for motion that it gets are based on a black object moving against a white background, and it's true, the pixel response time is slower-than-ideal here, but for real-world usage, I find this thing is 99% as good for live-action-sports as every other HDTV in my house is, including my 58" plasma (near-zero pixel response). OLED does a *lot* of things right. And it's better than LCD, including a 940E, in several ways. Certainly when it comes to perfectly-dark blacks, and fast pixel response, OLED wins. But it's not a clean-sweep across the board. Some OLEDs (particularly 2016 LGs, for example) have problems with near-blacks (black-crush), which, for me at least, partially-negated the advantage they have when it comes to black level. And issues/complaints about judder on OLEDs aren't uncommon, which I haven't have problems with on my 940E. And finally, size matters. I could have bought a 65" OLED for less money than I spent on this 75" 940E, but a similarly-sized OLED (77") is prohibitively priced, for me at least. My viewing distance being on the larger/longer side of things at 13', I knew I wanted to make a big step up, in size, from the 52" 1080p LCD I'd been using in my living room. At 75", this thing has been an amazing improvement. Things that aren't great about the 940E: -The built-in OS isn't good. And it's not because "Android stinks", I'll argue all day that "Android", and even "AndroidTV", really is pretty great. I own a Pixel phone, a Galaxy TabS (10.5") tablet, and five (yes five) NVidia Shield Android TV boxes, which I use to watch EVERYTHING (live TV/DVR via cablecard, streaming subscriptions like Netflix/Amazon/HBO, blu ray rips via Plex, etc) other than 4K HDR blu ray on my Sony 940E (I use an OPPO UDP-203 for 4K HDR blu rays, FWIW). But the AndroidTV experience that comes built-in to this TV really is poor. For $200, NVidia makes the same OS work *really* well. So, to me at least, this clearly means Sony cheaped out on the built-in hardware that's dedicated to running the Android S. This is part of the challenge/perception problem that Android faces, when someone spends more than $4000 on a TV and has such a poor Android experience, they're understandably going to be salty about that, and if they have never owned/used an NVidia Shield, they may blame the OS rather than the hardware running the OS... - Gaming in any sort of serious fashion (already discussed above - in short, the slow pixel response time I think is to blame, and I get nausea/dizzy any time I try to play a 1st person/3rd person shooter, which is something I DO NOT experience on any other TV/laptop in my house, all of which have faster pixel response times than this thing... which I do not believe is a coincidence). - "Low resolution" viewing... when you stretch a low-rez image all the way up to 75", it's not great. The upscaling of 1080p uncompressed blu ray content truly is incredible, and your old blu ray collection will come to life and look better than it ever has before, but 480p DVDs look rough at this size... this shouldn't be surprising to hear, but I mention it anyway, for completeness. All in all, as long as you don't want to play video games on it, I strongly recommend this TV to anyone who wants a LARGE set that will deliver VERY GOOD PICTURE QUALITY, and sports fans among us need not avoid this set because of the pixel resposne time and subsequent poor "motion" ratings it's received from various review websites. What they said is true. The Pixel response time is slow. But for real-world (not black-dot-on-white-screen) viewing of live action sports, the various motion settings on this TV can be used to calibrate out any motion problems I noticed outta the box. But before you spend this kind of cash, don't jus take my word for it; I definitely recommend you check out other reviews on it, particularly those from sources I personally like/respect, such as RTings, HDTVTest (videos on youtube), and AVS Forums. UPDATE - March 27, 2018 I'm deducting 1 star for the poor implementation of the "Dolby Vision Update", which only is supported for internal Sony 940E apps (see above for my review/opinion of the internal apps; not great). My top-of-the-line OPPO UDP-203 4K UHD blu ray player, which supports Dolby Vision, can't pass Dolby Vision along to my $4,000+ 75" Sony TV. My opinion hasn't changed, in that I still believe Dolby Vision means more for lower-peak-brightness OLEDs than it does this sort of High Peak Brightness LCD. I don't think it's "ruined" this TV. But it was a promised feature, and this is a half-arsed implementation that nobody thought was even possible before Sony did it. It likely protects Sony from any legal action, as they did legally provide the Dolby Vision update they promised; but this isn't the Dolby Vision update this TV deserves, and the price point for this set was, IMO, a "no compromises" price point, and this is a compromise. So now I feel like I overpaid, and I'm frustrated, and I'm docking a star as a result. It's probably too late to sway anyone's opinions, but just in case it isn't, be advised: Dolby Vision is (currently) only supported for native apps, NOT external inputs.

5.0 out of 5 stars
By Ian Carmichael - Reviewed in the United States on November 21, 2017
Beautiful TV. If you want price protection, you're going to want to buy it somewhere else.
Summary: The TV is beautiful. I was worried about the motion blur issues mentioned in the rtings.com review, but, after spending a day watching both 4K Blu-ray content and playing 4K Xbox One X games, I'm glad to say that whatever weakness might be present doesn't register on me as a viewer or gamer. I love it. What I didn't love was running into Amazon's recent change in practice around price protection for large TV's. A truly disappointing experience. If you care about price protection on a large purchase like this, you're going to want to buy someplace else. Details Before turning it on, the first thing I noticed was the minimalist, narrow, flat, black bezel Sony is using. A much cleaner look than a metal or raised bezel. Almost looks like a flat sheet of glass. Dimensionally, it's a little deeper than the set it replaced (2" vs 1"). It sits a little further off the wall, but I like the overall look and I'm very satisfied with the result. Initial setup was no more or less complicated than the Samsung 4K TV it replaced -- which is to say, not as easy as it could be. If you have an HDR source, make sure you find the "Enhanced HDMI" setting to enable HDR input. (Home->Settings->External Inputs.) I could see being bothered by the Android menus if I was using them regularly ... but if you're like me, and mainly using the TV set on a single HDMI input, with a receiver managing external sources, you're rarely going to use the TV menus. One nit ... TV gives no indication that it's playing HDR content when you hit the Display button -- just shows resolution and aspect ratio. My Samsung identified HDR content, which was a convenient way to know everything was working right, as the whole HDR chain can be a little finicky to get set up. [Sony, if you're reading ... love to see this in a firmware update.] Dynamic range is really where this set stands out for me. When I compare it to the edge-lit Samsung un75ks900d (which sadly died on me and was unrepairable) what's immediately noticeable is how much blacker, black is. In a dark room ... it's genuinely hard to find the edges of the screen for dark content, and an all-black frame emits almost no light. My first test material was the sandstorm scene in mad max (4K, HDR). In a light-controlled room, the lightning strikes have a level of visual punch that makes the whole thing a pretty spectacular experience. As I mentioned above, was worried about the reported motion issues, but I don't see an issue (and I'm going to do myself a favor and not learn to recognize whatever technical issues might actually be present and just enjoy the set). Overall, first 48 hours... and I love the TV. Sadly, what I don't love is Amazon's recent change in practice around price protection for large TV purchases. Don't think it's ever been official policy, but until earlier this year, it appears they've had a practice of offering price adjustments within the 7-day return window. In my case, price dropped the day the TV arrived (Amazon the seller in both cases). Called Amazon the next day, and figured this would be the usual kind of straight-forward and delightful experience that I have come to expect from Amazon. They offered me only the option of returning the current TV for a full refund and ordering a new one. I have no real issue with this being Amazon's policy for smaller items where they don't want to manage requests for trivial price adjustments. That's a minor inconvenience. But for a 100-pound television, where the price drop can be far from trivial, to learn my only path for credit is to arrange to be present for delivery and pickup and to go thru install and set up a 2nd time -- this isn't a minor inconvenience. This is just disrespectful of my time and absurd (Amazon paying for two special deliveries and someone's eating the cost of a TV that can't be sold as new). I can't really recommend purchasing any large, expensive, television from Amazon, for as long as this remains their practice. Go buy somewhere that'll give you a no hassle credit for a price drop during the return window.