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Kreg K5 Pocket-Hole Jig
Kreg K5 Pocket-Hole Jig
Kreg K5 Pocket-Hole Jig
Kreg K5 Pocket-Hole Jig
Kreg K5 Pocket-Hole Jig
Kreg K5 Pocket-Hole Jig
Kreg K5 Pocket-Hole Jig

Kreg K5 Pocket-Hole Jig

Kreg K5 Pocket-Hole Jig
Kreg K5 Pocket-Hole Jig
Kreg K5 Pocket-Hole Jig
Kreg K5 Pocket-Hole Jig
Kreg K5 Pocket-Hole Jig
Kreg K5 Pocket-Hole Jig
Kreg K5 Pocket-Hole Jig
$153.99
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Features

  • The new Kreg Jig K5 is packed with features your are sure to appreciate. The clamping method is Toggle clamp on benchtop base
  • It comes with a convenient front-mounted clamping handle, and it's connected to a ratcheting clamp mechanism that adjusts without tools or lock nuts
  • The quick-release Drill Guide Block makes set up simple
  • Front-mounted clamp handle makes clamping easy
  • Ratcheting clamp mechanism adjusts without tools
  • Quick-release pin holds drill block in place, and can't get lost
  • Storage Wings provide built-in storage for bits, screws, accessories
  • Stop-Collar Setting Block makes drill bit setup easy

Description

The New Kreg Jig K5 Is Packed With Features Your Are Sure To Appreciate. It Comes With A Convenient Front-Mounted Clamping Handle, And It'S Connected To A Ratcheting Clamp Mechanism That Adjusts Without Tools Or Lock Nuts. The Quick-Release Drill Guide Block Makes Set Up Simple, And The Removable Support Wings Support Large Work Pieces And Provide Additional Storage Inside. Dust-Collection Is Also Standard, With A Swiveling Dust-Collection Port For Ease Of Use. Adding In The Adjustable Workpiece Stop, Hex-Shank Drill And Driver Bits, A Screw-Selection Chart, And The Durable Construction You Expect From Kreg, And You Have The Most Advanced Kreg Jig Yet.


Manufacturer Kreg


Part Number K5


Item Weight 4.9 pounds


Product Dimensions 23.5 x 9.5 x 5 inches


Item model number K5


Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No


Color Blue and black


Style Jig


Material Plastic


Item Package Quantity 1


Head Style 12-Point


Measurement System Metric


Certification (unset)


Batteries Included? No


Batteries Required? No


ASIN B00EF3L9BM


Customer Reviews 4.6 out of 5 stars 1,160 ratings 4.6 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #5,150 in Tools & Home Improvement (See Top 100 in Tools & Home Improvement) #12 in Power Tool Accessory Jigs


Date First Available August 9, 2013


Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Unless otherwise stated above, most products arrive within 2-3 business days. Larger items may take 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Features

  • The new Kreg Jig K5 is packed with features your are sure to appreciate. The clamping method is Toggle clamp on benchtop base
  • It comes with a convenient front-mounted clamping handle, and it's connected to a ratcheting clamp mechanism that adjusts without tools or lock nuts
  • The quick-release Drill Guide Block makes set up simple
  • Front-mounted clamp handle makes clamping easy
  • Ratcheting clamp mechanism adjusts without tools
  • Quick-release pin holds drill block in place, and can't get lost
  • Storage Wings provide built-in storage for bits, screws, accessories
  • Stop-Collar Setting Block makes drill bit setup easy

Description

The New Kreg Jig K5 Is Packed With Features Your Are Sure To Appreciate. It Comes With A Convenient Front-Mounted Clamping Handle, And It'S Connected To A Ratcheting Clamp Mechanism That Adjusts Without Tools Or Lock Nuts. The Quick-Release Drill Guide Block Makes Set Up Simple, And The Removable Support Wings Support Large Work Pieces And Provide Additional Storage Inside. Dust-Collection Is Also Standard, With A Swiveling Dust-Collection Port For Ease Of Use. Adding In The Adjustable Workpiece Stop, Hex-Shank Drill And Driver Bits, A Screw-Selection Chart, And The Durable Construction You Expect From Kreg, And You Have The Most Advanced Kreg Jig Yet.


Manufacturer Kreg


Part Number K5


Item Weight 4.9 pounds


Product Dimensions 23.5 x 9.5 x 5 inches


Item model number K5


Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No


Color Blue and black


Style Jig


Material Plastic


Item Package Quantity 1


Head Style 12-Point


Measurement System Metric


Certification (unset)


Batteries Included? No


Batteries Required? No


ASIN B00EF3L9BM


Customer Reviews 4.6 out of 5 stars 1,160 ratings 4.6 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #5,150 in Tools & Home Improvement (See Top 100 in Tools & Home Improvement) #12 in Power Tool Accessory Jigs


Date First Available August 9, 2013


Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Unless otherwise stated above, most products arrive within 2-3 business days. Larger items may take 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Features

  • The new Kreg Jig K5 is packed with features your are sure to appreciate. The clamping method is Toggle clamp on benchtop base
  • It comes with a convenient front-mounted clamping handle, and it's connected to a ratcheting clamp mechanism that adjusts without tools or lock nuts
  • The quick-release Drill Guide Block makes set up simple
  • Front-mounted clamp handle makes clamping easy
  • Ratcheting clamp mechanism adjusts without tools
  • Quick-release pin holds drill block in place, and can't get lost
  • Storage Wings provide built-in storage for bits, screws, accessories
  • Stop-Collar Setting Block makes drill bit setup easy

Description

The New Kreg Jig K5 Is Packed With Features Your Are Sure To Appreciate. It Comes With A Convenient Front-Mounted Clamping Handle, And It'S Connected To A Ratcheting Clamp Mechanism That Adjusts Without Tools Or Lock Nuts. The Quick-Release Drill Guide Block Makes Set Up Simple, And The Removable Support Wings Support Large Work Pieces And Provide Additional Storage Inside. Dust-Collection Is Also Standard, With A Swiveling Dust-Collection Port For Ease Of Use. Adding In The Adjustable Workpiece Stop, Hex-Shank Drill And Driver Bits, A Screw-Selection Chart, And The Durable Construction You Expect From Kreg, And You Have The Most Advanced Kreg Jig Yet.


Manufacturer Kreg


Part Number K5


Item Weight 4.9 pounds


Product Dimensions 23.5 x 9.5 x 5 inches


Item model number K5


Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No


Color Blue and black


Style Jig


Material Plastic


Item Package Quantity 1


Head Style 12-Point


Measurement System Metric


Certification (unset)


Batteries Included? No


Batteries Required? No


ASIN B00EF3L9BM


Customer Reviews 4.6 out of 5 stars 1,160 ratings 4.6 out of 5 stars


Best Sellers Rank #5,150 in Tools & Home Improvement (See Top 100 in Tools & Home Improvement) #12 in Power Tool Accessory Jigs


Date First Available August 9, 2013


abunda_amazon_reviews Pros: New clamping system makes it easy to adjust it to the thickness of your material. Cons: The vacuum port attachment is flimsy and falls off if your vacuum hose shifts. You can no longer clamp the jig to your work surface. I don't like the drill bit adjustment method. My experience is that it is not accurate. I set it on my K5 as instructed and compared it to the adjustment on my K4 and it was off almost 1/8".;;Reviewed in the United States on May 16, 2017;;3.0 out of 5 stars;;I'll stick with my K4;;ClintonP;;;I bought the K5 jig in October 2014 and have used it continuously. I have used Kreg Jigs for over 10 years, my original jig being all metal. The metal jig never failed me, but was a hassle to use because the clamp adjustment was awkward. Plus, the K5 jig has adjustments for thickness of the wood, and length of screws, etc. The new slide in drill blocks for micro screws and 2x4 work proved valuable. My review of the Dowelmax jig compares Kreg pocket hole joinery to the doweling system. Tests published by Dowelmax show doweled joints are stronger than pocket holes; however, a joint doesn’t need maximum strength, it needs enough strength to do the job. You don’t find battleship bulkheads in destroyers. Also, modern glues add tremendous strength to joints. I glued a 45-degree joint, made from pine 1.5 inches wide, all end grain, with Tightbond III, and I couldn’t pull the joint apart. There was NO reinforcement. When it comes to speed and ease of cutting and assembly the Kreg system is superior to dowels. Both joints require square cuts where the joints come together, but the dowels require drilling two holes that must be exactly aligned. Any deviation, even 1/64th of an inch, can impair the joint. The Kreg system requires holes in only one board of the joint. Then there is the glue. Dowels must be glued in, and after assembly the joint should be clamped and the glue must dry before moving forward. Glue can be used in pocket hole joinery but the screws pull the joint together not clamps. Clamping dowel joints can be a problem, because misalignment of the clamps can pull the joint out of square. Using dowels on frames can add hours to the project. First you glue up three sides of the frame and wait for the glue to dry. Then the panel is added. Then the final side of the frame is glued into place and once again the glue must dry. Using the Kreg jig the joint is ready as soon as the screws are in. There are downsides. Pocket holes show, and if a blind joint is needed pocket holes often will not do. Inserts are made to disguise the pockets, and these can be creatively used as a design feature, but these inserts are noticeable and often not appropriate. If you are going to cut on a project after the joints are assembled the Kreg screws may be a problem. If a saw blade or router bit hits those screws that tool is gone. Kreg screws are hard, thus they can destroy a blade. Finally, the pocket hole joint must be well clamped before the screws are installed. The screws will pull the joint out of square if not tightly clamped; however, this isn’t all that hard and Kreg has several specialized clamps to help with the process. Why not five stars? Because the K5 jig has failed me twice while clamping wood to the jig. The clamp broke once because a screw came loose under the clamp. The second problem occurred today when the clamp slipped back after pressure was applied. I took the jig apart and a small rubber ball fell out of the main body of the clamp. After examination I determined the ball was deformed somewhat, but other than that I couldn’t find anything wrong with the jig. The inside of the jig is mostly plastic, but the key part that holds the clamp’s position on the ribbed track is good quality metal (and the screws are metal). I put the jig back together and it works, but I don’t know for how long. The rubber ball seems to maintain the pressure that pushes the metal tongue into the ratcheting ribbed track. An odd set up. How long can a rubber ball maintain the needed pressure? So, 4 stars for the jig. The system it supports is outstanding, but the jig itself seems to have been made in a less than outstanding manner. I cannot give a jig comprised of plastic and a rubber ball in critical locations 5 stars. AD2;;Reviewed in the United States on July 30, 2015;;4.0 out of 5 stars;;Great System but the Jig Is Oddly Constructed & Sometimes Fails;;Alan Dale Daniel;;;Amazingly useful for pockethole joinery, especially when doing a lot of PHs of consistent depth. I give this a 5 star rating for overall usefulness but deduct two stars because the vacuum port attachment comes apart quite easily when I'm working and you have to be VERY careful that the depth adjustment does not change while drilling. The small pin that holds the column in place has come un-anchored multiple times and my pocket holes have varied in depth as a result (and as a result of me not paying attention to this).;;Reviewed in the United States on June 23, 2016;;3.0 out of 5 stars;;Useful and awesome but use with care;;Willji;;;The jig is mostly well-designed and drills nice pocket holes, but for the price asked, I expected better. The plastic is VERY shiny and smooth. No matter how well you clamp your pieces down, they often (more often than not) slip or twist when driving the drill bit in. Does it matter that much in the end? Not really.. pocket holes never need to be all that precise, but it's frustrating sometimes. The drill bit collar slips a little bit over time as well, and occasionally needs to be readjusted and re tightened. After a couple dozen pocket holes you may start noticing that you have a bit of protrusion at the end of your wood as the bit went too far in due to collar slippage. I've also had a lot of issues with the dust collection cover falling off. It BARELY clips into place with two tiny ~1.5mm plastic clips.. it doesn't take much force at all for the lid to pop off, and it often does. Again, frustrating and could have easily been improved. Now let's talk about the clamping system... what on earth was Kreg thinking? Slide clamp back, insert work piece, push down clamping lever, slide clamp forward, hold clamp in place while simultaneously lifting the lever to ratchet the clamp in place, then finally push the lever down to secure it in place. Maybe it's a clever mechanism from an engineering standpoint, but it's a ridiculous number of steps for something that could be achieved much more simply using a different kind of mechanism. It just adds extra time needed to clamp down every piece.. and when you're drilling hundreds of pocket holes, that time adds up. I've also had issues with the clamping pressure pushing indentations in to plywood, so I've become accustomed to keeping a scrap piece pressed against the clamp so I don't end up with squares all over my finished product. For a $130 tool, they could spend a bit more effort on some of these issues. I can't imagine for a second that nobody at Kreg noticed the slippage problems when testing the product before release. It happens ALL. THE. TIME. The only conclusion I can come up with is that it was cheaper to release it as-is than to roughen up the materials a bit so workpieces don't slide around. Overall, I like the tool and it does what it's advertised to do, and it does it well. I just don't think it's worth what they want for it. I'd personally value the tool at about half of what they want for it.;;Reviewed in the United States on November 1, 2018;;3.0 out of 5 stars;;Good product, but very overpriced for the quality and too much slipage and convoluted clamp design;;Noneya Bizness

Shipping

This product includes free shipping to all US addresses.


Delivery

Orders placed now will arrive in 6-9 business days. Tracking information will be automatically provided as soon as your order ships.


View our full shipping policy here.

Returns

This product can be returned within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. Please visit our returns center to begin a return.

View our full returns policy here.

Top Amazon Reviews


3.0 out of 5 stars
By ClintonP - Reviewed in the United States on May 16, 2017
I'll stick with my K4
Pros: New clamping system makes it easy to adjust it to the thickness of your material. Cons: The vacuum port attachment is flimsy and falls off if your vacuum hose shifts. You can no longer clamp the jig to your work surface. I don't like the drill bit adjustment method. My experience is that it is not accurate. I set it on my K5 as instructed and compared it to the adjustment on my K4 and it was off almost 1/8".

4.0 out of 5 stars
By Alan Dale Daniel - Reviewed in the United States on July 30, 2015
Great System but the Jig Is Oddly Constructed & Sometimes Fails
I bought the K5 jig in October 2014 and have used it continuously. I have used Kreg Jigs for over 10 years, my original jig being all metal. The metal jig never failed me, but was a hassle to use because the clamp adjustment was awkward. Plus, the K5 jig has adjustments for thickness of the wood, and length of screws, etc. The new slide in drill blocks for micro screws and 2x4 work proved valuable. My review of the Dowelmax jig compares Kreg pocket hole joinery to the doweling system. Tests published by Dowelmax show doweled joints are stronger than pocket holes; however, a joint doesn’t need maximum strength, it needs enough strength to do the job. You don’t find battleship bulkheads in destroyers. Also, modern glues add tremendous strength to joints. I glued a 45-degree joint, made from pine 1.5 inches wide, all end grain, with Tightbond III, and I couldn’t pull the joint apart. There was NO reinforcement. When it comes to speed and ease of cutting and assembly the Kreg system is superior to dowels. Both joints require square cuts where the joints come together, but the dowels require drilling two holes that must be exactly aligned. Any deviation, even 1/64th of an inch, can impair the joint. The Kreg system requires holes in only one board of the joint. Then there is the glue. Dowels must be glued in, and after assembly the joint should be clamped and the glue must dry before moving forward. Glue can be used in pocket hole joinery but the screws pull the joint together not clamps. Clamping dowel joints can be a problem, because misalignment of the clamps can pull the joint out of square. Using dowels on frames can add hours to the project. First you glue up three sides of the frame and wait for the glue to dry. Then the panel is added. Then the final side of the frame is glued into place and once again the glue must dry. Using the Kreg jig the joint is ready as soon as the screws are in. There are downsides. Pocket holes show, and if a blind joint is needed pocket holes often will not do. Inserts are made to disguise the pockets, and these can be creatively used as a design feature, but these inserts are noticeable and often not appropriate. If you are going to cut on a project after the joints are assembled the Kreg screws may be a problem. If a saw blade or router bit hits those screws that tool is gone. Kreg screws are hard, thus they can destroy a blade. Finally, the pocket hole joint must be well clamped before the screws are installed. The screws will pull the joint out of square if not tightly clamped; however, this isn’t all that hard and Kreg has several specialized clamps to help with the process. Why not five stars? Because the K5 jig has failed me twice while clamping wood to the jig. The clamp broke once because a screw came loose under the clamp. The second problem occurred today when the clamp slipped back after pressure was applied. I took the jig apart and a small rubber ball fell out of the main body of the clamp. After examination I determined the ball was deformed somewhat, but other than that I couldn’t find anything wrong with the jig. The inside of the jig is mostly plastic, but the key part that holds the clamp’s position on the ribbed track is good quality metal (and the screws are metal). I put the jig back together and it works, but I don’t know for how long. The rubber ball seems to maintain the pressure that pushes the metal tongue into the ratcheting ribbed track. An odd set up. How long can a rubber ball maintain the needed pressure? So, 4 stars for the jig. The system it supports is outstanding, but the jig itself seems to have been made in a less than outstanding manner. I cannot give a jig comprised of plastic and a rubber ball in critical locations 5 stars. AD2

3.0 out of 5 stars
By Willji - Reviewed in the United States on June 23, 2016
Useful and awesome but use with care
Amazingly useful for pockethole joinery, especially when doing a lot of PHs of consistent depth. I give this a 5 star rating for overall usefulness but deduct two stars because the vacuum port attachment comes apart quite easily when I'm working and you have to be VERY careful that the depth adjustment does not change while drilling. The small pin that holds the column in place has come un-anchored multiple times and my pocket holes have varied in depth as a result (and as a result of me not paying attention to this).

3.0 out of 5 stars
By Noneya Bizness - Reviewed in the United States on November 1, 2018
Good product, but very overpriced for the quality and too much slipage and convoluted clamp design
The jig is mostly well-designed and drills nice pocket holes, but for the price asked, I expected better. The plastic is VERY shiny and smooth. No matter how well you clamp your pieces down, they often (more often than not) slip or twist when driving the drill bit in. Does it matter that much in the end? Not really.. pocket holes never need to be all that precise, but it's frustrating sometimes. The drill bit collar slips a little bit over time as well, and occasionally needs to be readjusted and re tightened. After a couple dozen pocket holes you may start noticing that you have a bit of protrusion at the end of your wood as the bit went too far in due to collar slippage. I've also had a lot of issues with the dust collection cover falling off. It BARELY clips into place with two tiny ~1.5mm plastic clips.. it doesn't take much force at all for the lid to pop off, and it often does. Again, frustrating and could have easily been improved. Now let's talk about the clamping system... what on earth was Kreg thinking? Slide clamp back, insert work piece, push down clamping lever, slide clamp forward, hold clamp in place while simultaneously lifting the lever to ratchet the clamp in place, then finally push the lever down to secure it in place. Maybe it's a clever mechanism from an engineering standpoint, but it's a ridiculous number of steps for something that could be achieved much more simply using a different kind of mechanism. It just adds extra time needed to clamp down every piece.. and when you're drilling hundreds of pocket holes, that time adds up. I've also had issues with the clamping pressure pushing indentations in to plywood, so I've become accustomed to keeping a scrap piece pressed against the clamp so I don't end up with squares all over my finished product. For a $130 tool, they could spend a bit more effort on some of these issues. I can't imagine for a second that nobody at Kreg noticed the slippage problems when testing the product before release. It happens ALL. THE. TIME. The only conclusion I can come up with is that it was cheaper to release it as-is than to roughen up the materials a bit so workpieces don't slide around. Overall, I like the tool and it does what it's advertised to do, and it does it well. I just don't think it's worth what they want for it. I'd personally value the tool at about half of what they want for it.

Recent Reviews


3.0 out of 5 stars
By ClintonP - Reviewed in the United States on May 16, 2017
I'll stick with my K4
Pros: New clamping system makes it easy to adjust it to the thickness of your material. Cons: The vacuum port attachment is flimsy and falls off if your vacuum hose shifts. You can no longer clamp the jig to your work surface. I don't like the drill bit adjustment method. My experience is that it is not accurate. I set it on my K5 as instructed and compared it to the adjustment on my K4 and it was off almost 1/8".

4.0 out of 5 stars
By Alan Dale Daniel - Reviewed in the United States on July 30, 2015
Great System but the Jig Is Oddly Constructed & Sometimes Fails
I bought the K5 jig in October 2014 and have used it continuously. I have used Kreg Jigs for over 10 years, my original jig being all metal. The metal jig never failed me, but was a hassle to use because the clamp adjustment was awkward. Plus, the K5 jig has adjustments for thickness of the wood, and length of screws, etc. The new slide in drill blocks for micro screws and 2x4 work proved valuable. My review of the Dowelmax jig compares Kreg pocket hole joinery to the doweling system. Tests published by Dowelmax show doweled joints are stronger than pocket holes; however, a joint doesn’t need maximum strength, it needs enough strength to do the job. You don’t find battleship bulkheads in destroyers. Also, modern glues add tremendous strength to joints. I glued a 45-degree joint, made from pine 1.5 inches wide, all end grain, with Tightbond III, and I couldn’t pull the joint apart. There was NO reinforcement. When it comes to speed and ease of cutting and assembly the Kreg system is superior to dowels. Both joints require square cuts where the joints come together, but the dowels require drilling two holes that must be exactly aligned. Any deviation, even 1/64th of an inch, can impair the joint. The Kreg system requires holes in only one board of the joint. Then there is the glue. Dowels must be glued in, and after assembly the joint should be clamped and the glue must dry before moving forward. Glue can be used in pocket hole joinery but the screws pull the joint together not clamps. Clamping dowel joints can be a problem, because misalignment of the clamps can pull the joint out of square. Using dowels on frames can add hours to the project. First you glue up three sides of the frame and wait for the glue to dry. Then the panel is added. Then the final side of the frame is glued into place and once again the glue must dry. Using the Kreg jig the joint is ready as soon as the screws are in. There are downsides. Pocket holes show, and if a blind joint is needed pocket holes often will not do. Inserts are made to disguise the pockets, and these can be creatively used as a design feature, but these inserts are noticeable and often not appropriate. If you are going to cut on a project after the joints are assembled the Kreg screws may be a problem. If a saw blade or router bit hits those screws that tool is gone. Kreg screws are hard, thus they can destroy a blade. Finally, the pocket hole joint must be well clamped before the screws are installed. The screws will pull the joint out of square if not tightly clamped; however, this isn’t all that hard and Kreg has several specialized clamps to help with the process. Why not five stars? Because the K5 jig has failed me twice while clamping wood to the jig. The clamp broke once because a screw came loose under the clamp. The second problem occurred today when the clamp slipped back after pressure was applied. I took the jig apart and a small rubber ball fell out of the main body of the clamp. After examination I determined the ball was deformed somewhat, but other than that I couldn’t find anything wrong with the jig. The inside of the jig is mostly plastic, but the key part that holds the clamp’s position on the ribbed track is good quality metal (and the screws are metal). I put the jig back together and it works, but I don’t know for how long. The rubber ball seems to maintain the pressure that pushes the metal tongue into the ratcheting ribbed track. An odd set up. How long can a rubber ball maintain the needed pressure? So, 4 stars for the jig. The system it supports is outstanding, but the jig itself seems to have been made in a less than outstanding manner. I cannot give a jig comprised of plastic and a rubber ball in critical locations 5 stars. AD2

3.0 out of 5 stars
By Willji - Reviewed in the United States on June 23, 2016
Useful and awesome but use with care
Amazingly useful for pockethole joinery, especially when doing a lot of PHs of consistent depth. I give this a 5 star rating for overall usefulness but deduct two stars because the vacuum port attachment comes apart quite easily when I'm working and you have to be VERY careful that the depth adjustment does not change while drilling. The small pin that holds the column in place has come un-anchored multiple times and my pocket holes have varied in depth as a result (and as a result of me not paying attention to this).

3.0 out of 5 stars
By Noneya Bizness - Reviewed in the United States on November 1, 2018
Good product, but very overpriced for the quality and too much slipage and convoluted clamp design
The jig is mostly well-designed and drills nice pocket holes, but for the price asked, I expected better. The plastic is VERY shiny and smooth. No matter how well you clamp your pieces down, they often (more often than not) slip or twist when driving the drill bit in. Does it matter that much in the end? Not really.. pocket holes never need to be all that precise, but it's frustrating sometimes. The drill bit collar slips a little bit over time as well, and occasionally needs to be readjusted and re tightened. After a couple dozen pocket holes you may start noticing that you have a bit of protrusion at the end of your wood as the bit went too far in due to collar slippage. I've also had a lot of issues with the dust collection cover falling off. It BARELY clips into place with two tiny ~1.5mm plastic clips.. it doesn't take much force at all for the lid to pop off, and it often does. Again, frustrating and could have easily been improved. Now let's talk about the clamping system... what on earth was Kreg thinking? Slide clamp back, insert work piece, push down clamping lever, slide clamp forward, hold clamp in place while simultaneously lifting the lever to ratchet the clamp in place, then finally push the lever down to secure it in place. Maybe it's a clever mechanism from an engineering standpoint, but it's a ridiculous number of steps for something that could be achieved much more simply using a different kind of mechanism. It just adds extra time needed to clamp down every piece.. and when you're drilling hundreds of pocket holes, that time adds up. I've also had issues with the clamping pressure pushing indentations in to plywood, so I've become accustomed to keeping a scrap piece pressed against the clamp so I don't end up with squares all over my finished product. For a $130 tool, they could spend a bit more effort on some of these issues. I can't imagine for a second that nobody at Kreg noticed the slippage problems when testing the product before release. It happens ALL. THE. TIME. The only conclusion I can come up with is that it was cheaper to release it as-is than to roughen up the materials a bit so workpieces don't slide around. Overall, I like the tool and it does what it's advertised to do, and it does it well. I just don't think it's worth what they want for it. I'd personally value the tool at about half of what they want for it.